Insulation in a coop

Isaiah53

Songster
Jan 8, 2018
202
217
121
Osoyoos BC Canada
Hello fellow peep-les,

We're in the midst of planning for a couple of new coops. I had a question on insulation and was wondering if anyone could offer insight.

I live just outside/in a desert area of Canada. Our temperatures can get very extreme In the summer we can have 40C and winters we can go down to -25C, plus this year we had waaay too much snow. Summers are dry and can be windy.

While in the midst of designing an appropriate coop, I thought I'd ask what the best way to protect against extreme temperatures would be. Lots of windows that open outwards (screened with predator proof wire, with wooden shutters for winter and extreme weather. Lots of upper ventilation. But what about actual insulation, would this cause extreme heat retention in the summer? I do not want to live through another winter worrying about such cold weather. No electricity to the coop and hauling water every day, so trying to keep it as close to 0C to -1C in the winter would be helpful.

Forgive my naïvety, this is my first coop building venture. Currently the previous owner of this property had them in an open horse barn with a tarp for protection.

Thank you for your responses Much obliged.
 

oldhenlikesdogs

Moderator
BYC Staff
Premium Feather Member
6 Years
Jul 16, 2015
48,726
91,201
1,572
Wisconsin
Here in Wisconsin we get cold winters. Insulation can keep a coop slightly warmer than outside, but it still freezes my water. I bring a watering can of hot water to top off my ice and melt it 2x daily to provide drinking water.

In the summer insulation keeps a coop cooler longer in the day. Insulation can encourage rodents so have a plan to deal with them so they don't take over your walls.
 

Isaiah53

Songster
Jan 8, 2018
202
217
121
Osoyoos BC Canada
Here in Wisconsin we get cold winters. Insulation can keep a coop slightly warmer than outside, but it still freezes my water. I bring a watering can of hot water to top off my ice and melt it 2x daily to provide drinking water.

In the summer insulation keeps a coop cooler longer in the day. Insulation can encourage rodents so have a plan to deal with them so they don't take over your walls.

Thank you for your input. I believe there is a rodent/insect proof material to insert along the edges/top/bottom of the insulation to stop them from penetrating the insulation. I'll consider that in our building.

Appreciate your help!
 

lazy gardener

Crossing the Road
7 Years
Nov 7, 2012
27,615
27,134
917
CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
Before going further, check out the Woods open air coop. This design is perfect for all climates. My temp extremes are similar to yours. B/C ventilation is the primary requirement for flock management in the coop, insulation can have minimal value. It would be like having an insulated picnic cooler, but leaving the lid open all the time. Your coop, if of standard construction should have ventilation = to 10% of floor space, or 1 s.f./bird. And, yes, ventilation is required even at -35*C.
 

Isaiah53

Songster
Jan 8, 2018
202
217
121
Osoyoos BC Canada
Before going further, check out the Woods open air coop. This design is perfect for all climates. My temp extremes are similar to yours. B/C ventilation is the primary requirement for flock management in the coop, insulation can have minimal value. It would be like having an insulated picnic cooler, but leaving the lid open all the time. Your coop, if of standard construction should have ventilation = to 10% of floor space, or 1 s.f./bird. And, yes, ventilation is required even at -35*C.
 

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