Introducing younger hens to young Rooster but is older than hens.

Cryss

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
4,180
10,306
757
Northwest New Jersey
I wish people would post a link to those coops with photos and dimensions on here and ask for a review before they buy them. Most of the time we'll probably talk them out of it or suggest modifications to make them work.
As one who did by one of those coops...
I didn't post pictures and ask for a review before purchasing because I didn't even know about BYC. I spoke to my breeder about the best time to bring home my chickens and what to feed them and how to manage freezing water. I went online looking at coops, found TSC coops, and went to my local TSC to check them out personally. The box said 8 chickens, I was only getting 4. Great, I'm ahead already...not. And then there's chicken math.

I'm betting 99% of first time new coop owners have no idea they need to check to see if the company lies. If I buy a coffee maker to make 8 cups of coffee I assume that the one that says (on the box) it makes 4 cups is not the one I want. I buy the one that says 8 cups. A coop sold by a farm supply store would be assumed to know what they are doing and, hey, the box says 8 chickens. Why would any first timer think they were lying?
Shame on farm supply stores.
I now jump at the chance to quickly give my experience to newbies to help them get through the mistake and then move on to improving conditions. I have so much more to learn but this is something I can teach!
We gotta give newbies some empathy.
 

Lareebell

In the Brooder
Sep 14, 2019
20
13
31
San Diego, Ca
Thanks for the info. So much to learn. Building a run soon for the girls! It will be less of a worry so we can leave for s few days and they are safe in their coop/run.
 

Lareebell

In the Brooder
Sep 14, 2019
20
13
31
San Diego, Ca
Well I found someone to take the cockerels. He says for his hens. I am hoping they have a decent life. The 3 pullets are in the coop now: I feel bitter sweet as the hens might be easier. And I hope I can tame them so I can pick them up when I want. The number 2 cock today had us running around to catch him.
 

Lareebell

In the Brooder
Sep 14, 2019
20
13
31
San Diego, Ca
You'll do fine, getting them accustomed to you touching them is a huge step already.
It is a learning process and be warned it can and will get weird many times even with sweet little hens.
Luckily you have sooo many people that have years and years of experience with pretty much everything chickeny and are always happy to help out. :)
 

Lareebell

In the Brooder
Sep 14, 2019
20
13
31
San Diego, Ca
Also after the episode picking at my feet the other day. We probably have almost 1/2 acre. I went to go to my car and the two cockerels were nearby a few feet from the passengers side. I put my stuff in the driver side. The rose cone cockerel went behind my car and followed me opening up the gate. I turned around to see where he was. He has opened wings and traveling fast behind me. I turned around and he stopped. I kept saying “no” and didn’t turn my back on him while getting the gate. My son came out and stomped his feet and they both ran away. So if he saw my bright toenails
from that far away? Or he thinks I have treats or didn’t like me now? I find it interesting and puzzling. But maybe I am paranoid since the toe episode.
They went somewhere today saying they have hens. I hope they have a good life with them.
 

Cryss

Crossing the Road
Nov 12, 2017
4,180
10,306
757
Northwest New Jersey
Good choice, giving them to someone who has rooster experience. That rooster was showing his dominance over you with wings open. It wasn't just your toes. It was his hormones saying he needs to prove he is in charge of his world.
Don't be surprised if the girls peck your feet or clothes. It's not an agressive pecking. It's usually a "Hmm, what's this?" or a "Mommy. Mommy mommy MOMMY! Where's my snacks!" Type of pecking. Enjoy it.
If your girls have been handled frequently since they were little chicks they could still be allowing you to pick them up because they are used to it. If not they may not let you pick them up but they may learn to eat a small snack from your hand. When they are ready to lay eggs you will find them squatting in front of you. This is submission to you as their rooster. You can pet them and will find it easy to pick them up.
Don't pet them when they molt. Newly growing feathers can be painful when touched.
You will find it so much easier and absolutely enjoyable raising your girls without a cockerel or rooster.
Have fun!
 

Lareebell

In the Brooder
Sep 14, 2019
20
13
31
San Diego, Ca
Yes, I have been picking them up. One seems to always be in the forefront and 1 always seems to be the farthest away. So that one hasn’t been touched maybe as much. It sounds like you have to work more with the cockerels more. I wonder how people deal with those types of things? Grappling their legs and putting them upside down? The other one I had didn’t do that kind of thing and was more timid but maybe if he was the only roo, it would have been different. I saw a couple of the pullets today crouch down but I think they are too young for laying. About 10-11 weeks now. I have a buff, golden sex link and Ameracauna. The cauna seems to be more timid and
makes more noise when touched.
Bought a electric egg cooker, can’t wait!
 

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