Is it a good idea to introduce a new rooster to flock?

natyvidal

Songster
Mar 1, 2018
376
412
182
Dade City, Florida
Ok here is my dilema.
I’ve had my chickens for two and half years. In that time I’ve been very lucky that I’ve only lost one young rooster and one stupid hen that refused to follow rules!
I live in Dade City, Florida. It’s not the tropics but not bad weather either.
My flock is allowed during the day to free range 5 acres and to be cooped up at night for safety.
My hens/layers are different heritage breeds or hybrids. 37 hens and 2 roosters. We also have some juveniles that are being invited for “dinner”.
😂 regularly!
PROBLEM: one of the rooster, George, is adorable, sweet, good tempered, intelligent and has never attacked anyone. He was one of the easter egger chicks we bought at the beginning and knows me well.
The other rooster, Jefferson, was acquired from a neighbor, he was less than a year old, and I believe him to be an Americauna. He is the problem! Attacks everyone that comes to visit, including me. The farmhand hates him! It attacked my daughter's boyfriend and she wants him processed, etc. Right now he is caged. See picture. Red one. He just refuses to realize I am top dog and his spurs are almost two inches long!
solution: replace Jefferson with new homegrown rooster. Hope hens accept newcomer and breed with him.
Reason to have a minimum of two roosters? With a free ranging flock the roosters will protect the hens from predators. I also have two guinea hens that are my security guards for the flock from air borne threats. And a pair of African Geese that are my guard dogs if anything approach the property.

All suggestions and advise is welcomed in this matter. I want to do what is right for my flock! Should I keep Jefferson and grin and bear his behaviors 😩or turn him into an ingredient of a Brunswick stew?🥺. If the answer is Brunswick stew how should I introduce the new rooster to the flock successfully! Thank you for all your advice!
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Ebony Rose

Crowing
12 Years
May 26, 2009
2,604
5,886
471
David, Chiriquí, Panama
Eat the red bird, incubate a half dozen or more eggs, preferably with a broody hen as they'll automatically be integrated into the flock that way, as long as you do not isolate her and her offspring, and select the finest looking/acting cockerel of that hatch as your backup cockerel (future rooster). Because you have quite a few hens per rooster, your fertility may be low; you can adjust for that with incubating more eggs, or selecting eggs from George's favorite girl(s). Paint these favorite hens vents with food coloring (NOT RED food coloring) so that you know which eggs are theirs when laid. Raising a fresh rooster from your own flock is a bio-security conscious and effective way to maximize the chances of getting another rooster with the personality traits that you appreciate in George.
Although I'm not an expert on poultry, I have been raising chickens and quail for about 15 years. I live in a small country between North and South America, Panama. The weather here is very much like your weather there in Florida, south of Lake Okeechobee on the map. It's often hot and humid, afternoon storms for months and then not a drop of rain to be had for as many months. A rubbermaid-type tote filled with water with a frozen, repurposed milk jug, of ice will keep your flock cool and hydrated during the height of summer as long as they have somewhere on your five acres for them to find DEEP shade.
And yeah, eat that red bird. Mean roosters are a dime a dozen and Good roosters are priceless.
 

JedJackson

Crossing the Road
Premium Feather Member
5 Years
Jul 6, 2016
7,048
21,499
942
NW Washington state
I agree with Tycene. If the red rooster is aggressive toward humans, he likely will never change, so it is best to get rid of him. Raising a new rooster from the better behaved rooster is also a good idea. Or you could buy a male chick if you want new blood, and introduce him when he is feathered out. The reason to get a young one is to avoid fights with the other rooster. That is likely to happen if you introduce a new, full grown boy into the flock.
 

natyvidal

Songster
Mar 1, 2018
376
412
182
Dade City, Florida
Eat the red bird, incubate a half dozen or more eggs, preferably with a broody hen as they'll automatically be integrated into the flock that way, as long as you do not isolate her and her offspring, and select the finest looking/acting cockerel of that hatch as your backup cockerel (future rooster). Because you have quite a few hens per rooster, your fertility may be low; you can adjust for that with incubating more eggs, or selecting eggs from George's favorite girl(s). Paint these favorite hens vents with food coloring (NOT RED food coloring) so that you know which eggs are theirs when laid. Raising a fresh rooster from your own flock is a bio-security conscious and effective way to maximize the chances of getting another rooster with the personality traits that you appreciate in George.
Although I'm not an expert on poultry, I have been raising chickens and quail for about 15 years. I live in a small country between North and South America, Panama. The weather here is very much like your weather there in Florida, south of Lake Okeechobee on the map. It's often hot and humid, afternoon storms for months and then not a drop of rain to be had for as many months. A rubbermaid-type tote filled with water with a frozen, repurposed milk jug, of ice will keep your flock cool and hydrated during the height of summer as long as they have somewhere on your five acres for them to find DEEP shade.
And yeah, eat that red bird. Mean roosters are a dime a dozen and Good roosters are priceless.
Hi Tycine! Thank you. I know Panama well. I had friends from there when in college and visited one summer. I still have one good friend that lives in Colon province. It’s a Beautiful country. I think 15 years raising chickens and quails makes you quite the expert! I hate the idea of processing named pets like Jefferson, but can’t risk him attacking my family , farm hand, and visiting guests. Especially my two year old granddaughter. So into the Brunswick stew he goes. I already have a handsome in house cockerel that I have been grooming and trying to keep him comfortable with me and people. He is in the last picture. Handsome guy. Thank you again. And Merry Christmas!!!
 

natyvidal

Songster
Mar 1, 2018
376
412
182
Dade City, Florida
I agree with Tycene. If the red rooster is aggressive toward humans, he likely will never change, so it is best to get rid of him. Raising a new rooster from the better behaved rooster is also a good idea. Or you could buy a male chick if you want new blood, and introduce him when he is feathered out. The reason to get a young one is to avoid fights with the other rooster. That is likely to happen if you introduce a new, full grown boy into the flock.
Thank you for your time. I will follow your advice. Will follow all suggestions. And as alway BYC comes through for me! 🙏❤️👍. Thank you.
 

Phantom_k9

Songster
Oct 29, 2019
283
249
146
North Texas
My Coop
My Coop
Ok here is my dilema.
I’ve had my chickens for two and half years. In that time I’ve been very lucky that I’ve only lost one young rooster and one stupid hen that refused to follow rules!
I live in Dade City, Florida. It’s not the tropics but not bad weather either.
My flock is allowed during the day to free range 5 acres and to be cooped up at night for safety.
My hens/layers are different heritage breeds or hybrids. 37 hens and 2 roosters. We also have some juveniles that are being invited for “dinner”.
😂 regularly!
PROBLEM: one of the rooster, George, is adorable, sweet, good tempered, intelligent and has never attacked anyone. He was one of the easter egger chicks we bought at the beginning and knows me well.
The other rooster, Jefferson, was acquired from a neighbor, he was less than a year old, and I believe him to be an Americauna. He is the problem! Attacks everyone that comes to visit, including me. The farmhand hates him! It attacked my daughter's boyfriend and she wants him processed, etc. Right now he is caged. See picture. Red one. He just refuses to realize I am top dog and his spurs are almost two inches long!
solution: replace Jefferson with new homegrown rooster. Hope hens accept newcomer and breed with him.
Reason to have a minimum of two roosters? With a free ranging flock the roosters will protect the hens from predators. I also have two guinea hens that are my security guards for the flock from air borne threats. And a pair of African Geese that are my guard dogs if anything approach the property.

All suggestions and advise is welcomed in this matter. I want to do what is right for my flock! Should I keep Jefferson and grin and bear his behaviors 😩or turn him into an ingredient of a Brunswick stew?🥺. If the answer is Brunswick stew how should I introduce the new rooster to the flock successfully! Thank you for all your advice! View attachment 2438796 View attachment 2438797 View attachment 2438798
Wow, beautiful birds!
We don't have nearly as many free rangers (yet), but we have had our fair share of Roosters. In order for me to give my two cents, let me tell you about my experience with these guys.
Our first Roo, Ash, was a Dominique with a problem. He was a great roo; I swear I saw him fight off a hawk. But he would chase us around the yard, attack us semi-often, and even would fight my sister like she was another Roo. For obvious reasons we had to give him away.
Our second Roo, Hershey, was a Polish who was more of a hen than a Roo. He somehow managed to beat Ash for the spot of top dog, but after we got rid of Ash we immediately lost a bird to a hawk, three to a dog, and we had to take a more active presence outside. In his defense, his health declined after we got rid of Ash, and he passed away 5 months later from what I believe is a mixture of complications from fighting, and fat build up from layer feed.
Our current Roo, Maple, is a gorgeous Americana. He was around during the previously mentioned hawk and dog attacks. He is alert, protective, and generally speaking the perfect Rooster. He has shown a bit of aggression towards us, but most times it has been our fault.

I have done a lot of research on how to tame a bad Roo, and I (generally speaking) believe you can tame a really aggressive Roo, it just takes time and dedication. If you would like, I can post a few videos and some tips I have found that I have used in the past.

IMO, your problem is more how much time and effort you are willing to put into the bad apple. I believe that every bird should be given a chance. If you do decide to try and break in your bad Roo, and it doesn't work out, it would probably be best to put pot pie on the menu, or try to give him away. However, I would always argue in favor of trying to give your guy a chance.
Keeping in mind the size of your flock, you most defiantly need 2+ Roosters! While human aggression is never a good thing, it tells me that he is by all means a good protector. Also, if you do plan on trying to tame him, it may not be a bad idea to trim down, or at least dull, his 2" killers!
However, you will probably have a lot better luck raising a new Roo. If everyone holds him as a chick, and bonds with him, your odds will be a lot better. Like I said, its up to you.
I wish you good luck!
 
Last edited:

Mrs. K

Free Ranging
12 Years
Nov 12, 2009
9,464
13,112
656
western South Dakota
Mean roosters are a dime a dozen and Good roosters are priceless.

Exactly ^^ and no rooster is worth a wreck with a darling 2 year old granddaughter.

However, introducing a full grown rooster, could be tricky. It might go well, and it might be a disaster. ALWAYS with roosters have a plan B.

I too vote for the raise up a rooster chick in the flock. In my experience, you get a much better rooster, with a much better chance of being respectful of people.

Mrs K
 

Folly's place

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
24,134
41,827
1,156
southern Michigan
If you want new blood, and/ or if you don't have broody hens at the right time, get some straight run chicks of breeds you like, and plan to have them out at the coop by five or six weeks, at least. They can integrate into the flock gradually, and you will have cockerels to choose from.
Keeping a dangerous jerk is never a good idea!!!
Mary
 

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