is it actually safe to eat an egg that quit?

risingeaglefarm

Chirping
5 Years
Oct 2, 2014
154
3
63
I know that fresh eggs are supposed to be safe to keep at room temperature, as long as they are unwashed, because of the antibacterial film on the outside of the egg. So would a partially developed egg that died in the incubator still be safe to eat, too?….
This article seems to think so
http://businessdiary.com.ph/1139/how-to-start-a-balut-making-business/
Read step 8

I really want to try balut but I don't necessarily want to kill chicks to do it. So if I could eat the chicks that died during incubation that would be great.

Now my common sense tells me that to eat a dead animal that has been sitting in moist 100 degree temperature for 1 or two weeks would be a really bad idea.

But this article seems to be suggesting just that. And then, I guess what's the difference between eating a fertilized egg that's been sitting at room temp for a week and one that's partially developed and sitting in an incubator? Slightly higher temp, and a little more embryo... But doesn't the egg shell still keep bacteria out?

I don't necessarily want to eat eggs that are a week dead though, I was thinking of candling them everyday and cooking the dead ones right away.

What do y'all think? I know a lot of people are going to say "I wouldnt" but please put a little more thought into it than that
 

nchls school

Crowing
5 Years
Apr 22, 2015
6,878
3,584
376
Tennessee
Nature has designed the egg to stay viable until the whole clutch is laid so yes eggs can sit on the counter for a week or so and still be safe. But when an embryo dies bacteria start the decay process quickly. This is evident by the smell which starts soon after the chick dies in the shell. With that thought I couldn't/wouldn't eat this. And when it comes to food I am adventurous. I love trying new foods.
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,191
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
I know that fresh eggs are supposed to be safe to keep at room temperature, as long as they are unwashed, because of the antibacterial film on the outside of the egg. So would a partially developed egg that died in the incubator still be safe to eat, too?….
This article seems to think so
http://businessdiary.com.ph/1139/how-to-start-a-balut-making-business/
Read step 8

I really want to try balut but I don't necessarily want to kill chicks to do it. So if I could eat the chicks that died during incubation that would be great.

Now my common sense tells me that to eat a dead animal that has been sitting in moist 100 degree temperature for 1 or two weeks would be a really bad idea.

But this article seems to be suggesting just that. And then, I guess what's the difference between eating a fertilized egg that's been sitting at room temp for a week and one that's partially developed and sitting in an incubator? Slightly higher temp, and a little more embryo... But doesn't the egg shell still keep bacteria out?

I don't necessarily want to eat eggs that are a week dead though, I was thinking of candling them everyday and cooking the dead ones right away.

What do y'all think? I know a lot of people are going to say "I wouldnt" but please put a little more thought into it than that

joie de vivre..... Laissez les bons temps rouler
ya.gif


Duck eggs that have been incubated for 18 days and chicken eggs that have been incubated for 14 days are commonly sold and eaten as "ethnic" foods. Hard boil the eggs for 30 minutes to kill any bacteria that made its way inside the egg while the mommy duck or hen was sitting on it. These eggs are refered to as "balut" eggs.

The ducklings' or chicks' bones and down has not developed or hardened at this stage and you can eat the whole contents of the shell like you would a soft boiled egg.

1000


Let us know how your children like balut.
 
Last edited:

AmyLynn2374

Humidity Queen
5 Years
Oct 11, 2014
15,028
2,679
456
Gouverneur, NY
joie de vivre..... Laissez les bons temps rouler
ya.gif


Duck eggs that have been incubated for 18 days and chicken eggs that have been incubated for 14 days are commonly sold and eaten as "ethnic" foods. Hard boil the eggs for 30 minutes to kill any bacteria that made its way inside the egg while the mommy duck or hen was sitting on it. These eggs are refered to as "balut" eggs.

The ducklings' or chicks' bones and down has not developed or hardened at this stage and you can eat the whole contents of the shell like you would a soft boiled egg.

1000


Let us know how your children like balut.
First just let me say, I feel like I am in an epsisode of NCIS New Orleans...(Oh, we gonna let the good times roll...lol) and second
sickbyc.gif
To each their own. Watched an episode of Fear Factor, I believe it was where this "balut" you speak of was one of the challenges. I would have lost right there...lol
 

risingeaglefarm

Chirping
5 Years
Oct 2, 2014
154
3
63
Well we eat full grown chickens and eggs... Why not in between? Its not really any different lol
You have a point about decay
And then you never know if the chick died because of infection
 

chickengeorgeto

Crowing
7 Years
Dec 25, 2012
8,047
4,191
431
Big Bend of the Tennessee River's Right Bank.
First just let me say, I feel like I am in an epsisode of NCIS New Orleans...(Oh, we gonna let the good times roll...lol) and second
sickbyc.gif
To each their own. Watched an episode of Fear Factor, I believe it was where this "balut" you speak of was one of the challenges. I would have lost right there...lol

Oh, but Miss AmyLynn, where is your joie de vivre or joy of life? Some adventurous soul had to pry open and eat the first raw oyster, and I should add that this was way back there before horseradish sauce, saltine crackers and shots of Jägermeister was invented. If that adventurous bon vivant was not you, then who?
droolin.gif
 
Last edited:

AmyLynn2374

Humidity Queen
5 Years
Oct 11, 2014
15,028
2,679
456
Gouverneur, NY
Oh, but Miss AmyLynn, some adventurous soul had to first pry open and eat a raw oyster, and I should add that this was way back before the discovery of horseradish sauce or saltine crackers. If that adventurous bon vivant was not you, then who are the usual suspects?
droolin.gif
Keyser Soze...lol I am far from adventurous where food is concerned. Picky eater here...lol What would make someone pry open an oyster and eat that in the first place?
 

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