Is it me or the rooster?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Lisa Wood, Aug 19, 2016.

  1. Lisa Wood

    Lisa Wood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello. AGAIN I have a rooster question. He is 13 weeks. From whatcI have read he is not aggressive, but is the age to practice breeding.
    So this morning, during the quiet tranquility of doing my chick chores, he scares the %+&[email protected] out of me by practicing. I had full on view. He is on her back, has a good grip on the back of her neck to hold on. All normal, right? SHE is in pain. He is hurting her by holding back of her neck. She stopped screaming when it was over, and shook off, took a few to get herself back together. I will be checking her later today for laceration on back of neck.
    Of course, he goes for my two little Legbars only. Bigger chicks fight him off.
    It CANNOT be normal for God to make it painful and unpleasant every time. I have seen horses. Many males must get a grip simply to get the act done. But thecmares said yes. My chick is jumped by surprise, with her back turned.
     
  2. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    It looks worse than it is, but yes, the young fellas often take a while to get their technique sorted, as well as learning a few basic manners. As long as the condition of your pullets is not adversely affected, i personally would not worry too much. If its a concern to you, then maybe consider keeping him in his own pen until he matures.

    CT
     
  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    This is how chickens mate...probably should get used to it...
    .......it can be alarming to humans, but it's perfectly normal.
    Just because she screams, doesn't necessarily mean she's in excruciating pain or being wounded.
    Be careful applying human emotions/reactions to animals.

    Even pullets at Point Of Lay, 'scream bloody murder' when learning to be mated by a 'gentleman' cockbird.
    I've got a group at POL now and hear this multiple times a day, it sounds awful, but they are fine.

    13 weeks seems a bit young even to 'practice', are your pullets the same age?
    A cockerel that age assertively mounting same age pullets is pretty aggressive, IMO.

    As CTKen suggests, might be best to separate the cockerel until the pullets are at POL, or maybe rethink keeping any males at all if it upsets you.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2016
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  4. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    Also, Roosters have no penis...Its more like rubbing belly buttons together....Looks worse than it really is.....
     
  5. Lisa Wood

    Lisa Wood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes they are all same age and raised together. Please explain Point of Lay and why that matters?
     
  6. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Point of Lay is exactly that - the point where they are ready to lay eggs. It matters because once they start laying, (or get close to laying) they are generally more cooperative when being mated.
     
  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  8. Lisa Wood

    Lisa Wood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thankyou Art. It seems I have commited an error by asking twice. You have explained it well. I have looked and researched on this list, and other resources as well, with no more knowledge till now.
     
  9. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Honestly, I don't blame her for screaming and fighting. She's still a baby, barely in adolescence for a chicken. He's maturing a lot faster than her, and he has no older birds to keep him in check.

    Since he's pretty precocious, I'd consider pulling him for a month or so until the pullets gains some sexual maturity. Even at that point, there is a lot of confusion and noise when they're working out the mating thing. But, at least your pullets will be physically ready to be receptive to his advances and they can mutually figure out things.
     
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  10. Lisa Wood

    Lisa Wood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with your suggestion. I think its interesting to note the big girls do put him in his place. Or at least they say no and refuse him successfully. So in addition to being over sexed, he is not picking on someone his own size. He is being a bully and opportunist if I put it in people terms.
    My husband is out of town working. But I will have him fix another rooster space when he comes home.
    We did go for a walk tonight, me and the roo. Not for sexual infractions, but for bopping the little girls in the head when they were foraging for scratch. He got to come in house, meet all dogs, see his old room where he was a baby, and see a dog crate he can stay in if neccessary.
    After speaking to you, I am hoping later when all the girls are old enough, the others will take some heat off my little legbars.
    I am just basicallygonna pay attention to your posts and ignore the rest. Thanks again.
     

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