Is it worth it?

patman75

Songster
10 Years
Apr 17, 2009
1,709
24
194
Michigan - in the thumb
I was thinking of doing 2 batchs of meaties this year.

HOWEVER, last fall I bought 4 processed meaties from a local farmer who raises pasture raised organic meaties 4-6 pounds $10 each. He does 3 batches every year.

After reading about how much it would cost for me to do it and I'm having a hard time justifing raising my own meaties. If I raise them I might save a buck or 2 but i I have any loses then I'm at a wash. Then there is the time and work involved. I already have a full time job.

Am i missing something? Does this sound like a good deal?
 

Opa

Opa-wan Chickenobi
12 Years
May 11, 2008
9,573
476
336
Howell Michigan
Patman75. Personally I won't mess with raising meaties. While the taste of the birds is better and the logic behind raising your own so that you know what they've been fed is sound, I just can't justify the time necessary to raise and process them. If you take them some where for processing that's another demand on your time and it adds about $2 to the cost of each bird. There are several folks here in Michigan that sell theirs for a reasonable cost (Zepher Farm for one).
I guess what I'm saying is that since your time is limited you must decide how and where you wish to use it.

Be sure to click on the link in my signature line. We'd love to see you at Chickenstock.
 
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little_grey_bantam

Songster
10 Years
Mar 29, 2009
807
4
151
Russell County
BF thinks its not worth it -- too much mess, but you think about it now...
It's always easier to do the... well, easier thing!

But when it comes down to it, I think it's worth it!
You raise your birds, they're cared for, fed well and than eaten after having a good life.
What you eat builds up over time.

Like if you smoke, yeah once or twice is whatever, but over the years, it adds up to your health!
You get lung cancer!

If you raise and eat fresh meat, it'll give you a good sense of well-being.
You raise birds already (if you don't than......) why not raise some for eating?

For layers, you get them as chicks, feed them for 5-7 months, wait for them to lay and well, they lay AN egg a day. ONE egg.
It'd be much easier to purchase from said store or from another

On the other hand, you could purchase from people; people just get a sense of well-being and accomplishment for raising their own birds! So I guess it's worth it. I mean, you can do it once a year just to remind you
smile.png


So is it worth it to raise a layer?
 

patman75

Songster
10 Years
Apr 17, 2009
1,709
24
194
Michigan - in the thumb
I'm not sure I can get a better quality meat bird if the farmer is pasture raising them and feed organically & processed for $10.

Not to mention all I have to do is call the guy and order 3 sets of 15 birds and then just drive 20 minutes to pick them up. No extra chores, time, different feeds, coops, ect...

How much better of a price can I get all that at? From the posts I have read it will cost $7-8 per bird and then another $2 to be processed (unless I do it myself).

I love the thought of raising my own, that why I have layers. Soo torn.
 

Brunty_Farms

Songster
12 Years
Apr 29, 2007
2,305
35
221
Ohio
Quote:
I would jump all over that if I was you. $10.00 each is a steal if it what he says they are. Go and visit the farm and ask to see the birds. But ya, save yourself the headache... especially if your getting a price like that.

I get $10.00 at farm and $11.50 at market for a 3.5-4 lb dressed weight fryer.
 

KatyTheChickenLady

Bird of A Different Feather
11 Years
Dec 20, 2008
5,146
25
251
Boise, Idaho
I started with layers and love them to death, then like you did the $ comparison for meat birds it made no sense with comparable birds available.
I also buy my two hogs a year from a local farmer who feeds cares for them exactly the way I would. Then, last year the hog farmer lost a sow, and a litter, and I only was able to get one pig from him, I had to buy the second from someone else; the quality and value of that second hog was so far below what we had been getting, that we found ourselves giving the meat away and buying at the store. That really got me to thinking and led me to decide to raise some of my meat myself. Thus the foray into meat birds (they seemed like the easiest place to start). So here I am, not for the savings of $, but for the peace of mind. I had the added advantage of space, time, and affordable butcher; had I been lacking either I think I would still be buying.
When I feel that I've got the meat birds off the ground I think I will move into turkey and quail (next year?), then I would like to step up to goats, rabbits, steer, pigs . . . maybe but only one little baby step at a time.
I think that by the time my husband and I are ready to retire (5 years?) I should be able and experienced enough to provide our meat/eggs. I do wish I had started down this road when the kids were smaller as they are really into it, but better late than never.
Maybe this is to lengthy, but just wanted to explain from a different perspective why it IS worth it to me.
 

TimG

Songster
11 Years
Jul 23, 2008
1,353
26
194
Maine
Quote:
I doubt you can raise them yourself for that price if you are feeding them certified organic feed. If I wanted organic chickens, I'd get myself on that guy's waiting list -- he must easily sell out at that price.
 

silkiechicken

Staff PhD
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
13 Years
Jan 25, 2007
21,494
1,027
393
Everett WA/Corvallis OR
At $10 a bird, unless you really wanted to raise them yourself for fun or non economical reasons... I wouldn't bother. I was selling ~5lb dressed birds to a few people for 15-20 each... and those were not organic, just raised outdoors.
 

patman75

Songster
10 Years
Apr 17, 2009
1,709
24
194
Michigan - in the thumb
I double checked and they are not organic. They are All natural and chemical free. All Natural could be a lot of things.

But they are pasture raised, I saw that when I picked up the 4 I bought last year.

So i'm assuming he is picking up the same feed I get from the grain elevator but raising them on a pasture during the day and locking them up in the barn at night.

HHHMMM...........
 

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