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Just added nexting boxes, but what to line them with?!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by flirty31, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. flirty31

    flirty31 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    We JUST added our nesting boxes, the girls are 25 weeks old today and still not laying yet.

    I'm wondering what material to put in the nesting boxes? it's hard to see, but we put pine shavings in the coop and run right now, and I'm wondering what to do with the nest boxes. Any advice appreciated!

    Also, taking bets on when they'll start laying, here's a photo of them at 24 weeks:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Tabasco Jack

    Tabasco Jack Chillin' With My Peeps

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    People use all kinds of stuff but hay works the best IMO. It's cheap, easy to clean out and it compost easily.
    I tried the plastic nest box liners and my chickens refused to sit on them. So i just get the cheap straw the sell at home depot or lowes.
     
  3. flirty31

    flirty31 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I heard to use straw not hay, is there a difference?
     
  4. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    You can bed them with any of things mentioned. All work.

    What is needed, in most cases, is that good 3" lip on the front of nest box. This really, really helps to keep the bedding in the box and not scratched out onto the ground.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2013
  5. MoonShadows

    MoonShadows The Jam Man

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    Hay is often a tall field grass, usually a variety called Timothy. When it is mature, the grass is cut a ground level and the whole plant; stalks, leaf blades and seed heads, are left where they fall to dry in the summer sun. When dried, they are baled in rectangular-shaped bales, to feed animals that range from domestic animals on farms to wild animals at zoos.

    Straw is somewhat of a by-product. After cereal grain grasses, such as wheat, rye and barley have been harvested for the grain-bearing seed head, the hollow stems of these grass plants remain. These hollow stems or straw, are baled up much like the hay in rectangular-shape bales. The hollow stems make for good insulating material, and for centuries straw has been used in farms and stables as warm bedding for animals...such as chickens.
     
  6. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Pine chips. I also add old carpet pieces for the base before I add the chips. A board on the front keeps the material and eggs in the box. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. flirty31

    flirty31 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    I got my first egg ever today! But as you can see, the ladies tend to take out all the pine shavings :(
    Maybe I need to add some reinforcement so they can't!
     
  8. FlockOForbes

    FlockOForbes Out Of The Brooder

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    Yay! Mine are 16 weeks and we still have some weeks left before eggs. I can't wait! Congrats!
     
  9. flirty31

    flirty31 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you, thank you! The waiting was KILLING me!!![​IMG]
     
  10. colburg

    colburg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013

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