Just. Plain. Weird.

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by BBQJOE, Dec 1, 2015.

  1. BBQJOE

    BBQJOE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Void where prohibited.
    I recently bought a Jack Russell. My wife and I raised and sold a number of litters before both parents died or disappeared.
    I bought a male, and have been on the lookout for a female. I found one the other day on CL.
    I called her yesterday, and told her I would paypal a down payment today, she said fine.
    I called her today, she wanted to know if I knew anything about them. I told her yes, I used to raise them, and I just got a new male. She wanted to know if I was going to breed them, I said yes.
    She wanted to see the pedigree, so I emailed it to her.
    She is now telling me her husband and her discussed it, and don't believe it would be a good "tick"
    WTH is a tick, and why would she be refusing my $550?

    This is the weirdest thing I have ever come across.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2015
  2. Teila

    Teila Bambrook Bantams Premium Member

    Hey BBQJOE could she have meant a good “click” as in the pedigrees are not compatible?
     
  3. Free Feather

    Free Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

    Maybe she does not like the idea of her being bought to be bred. Or, she thinks your male is inferior.
    A tick is an insect that bites mammals and sucks their blood...
     
  4. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    part of breeding is researching bloodlines. and part of being a responsible breeder is making sure that your dogs go to good homes.

    a good tick means that she doesn't think your boy's bloodlines are a good match for the dogs she is selling. Did you research the females pedigree before you made plans to purchase her?
     
  5. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    a good word of advise is that you are unlikely to find a quality female on Craig's List. since it's against the site policy to sell litters of puppies on the site no responsible breeder is going to use it.
    if you plan to breed, starting with joining your local club and joining the Jack Russell Terrier Club of America.
     
  6. Chickerdoodle13

    Chickerdoodle13 The truth is out there...

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    Yep, I would definitely start with talking to breeders at shows! Not only are shows a lot of fun to attend, but you can get a feel for a lot of different breeders in your particular breed of choice.

    It depends what you want to use the dogs for, but I always recommend getting your dog checked out for any medical issues common in the breed, and looking for the same in any potential mate. Ideally, a female would compliment your male's conformation and behavioral faults to improve in the next generation. However, you may have quite a few breeders turn their noses up at the idea of a person owning both the male and female for breeding. It can be difficult to find the perfect complement for each dog, so many breeders resort to choosing a mate they do not own, or using AI. Otherwise, to improve the breed, they would potentially have to own one male for every female, or perhaps more than that!

    I hesitate to recommend looking for dogs on Craigslist. You just never know what you will end up with, and way too many people end up with "free" or inexpensive animals that end up costing a fortune in medical issues!
     
  7. BBQJOE

    BBQJOE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    After doing a little research with the help of a friend, we were able to find out that she is not really certain of her dogs lineage. So in essence she was being a bit slippery about things.
     
  8. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    that is something you should have figured out yourself before even considering the female. Did you not ask her for pedigree and other info? health tests on the sire and dam and their ancestors?
     
  9. dainerra

    dainerra Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm coming at it from the perception of a breeder. "I don't think the bloodlines would click" is often a polite way of saying "I don't think you know enough to own a dog from me" when someone says they plan to breed.
    If someone answers an ad and doesn't ask in depth detailed questions about the pedigree, health and temperament of the dogs (pedigree and basic health info should always be in the ad) and then tells me they want to breed, no they won't be getting a puppy.
    In a given geographic area, all the breeders tend to know each other and word gets around really fast that "hey, someone is looking for a female. They want to breed." and your name ends up on a blacklist pretty fast :(

    Easier to do homework and network first. Look for a puppy second, if you plan to breed.
     
  10. Teila

    Teila Bambrook Bantams Premium Member

    At the risk of being shot down in flames ….

    May be, if that attitude is adopted by the majority of breeders, this is why puppy factories have become the norm.

    The person you told “no, you won’t be getting a puppy” goes off and buys their puppy at half the price from one of those factories and breeds him or her producing more sub par puppies.

    I understand that breeders do not want 'just anyone' breeding from their bloodlines but rather than disregard the person on their lack of knowledge or inability to communicate at a level they feel appropriate, it may be better to guide and assist?

    Yep, homework and networking is a good idea but some people may like to have a litter of puppies to keep and work on the farm etc ... by the time they have 'networked' enough to become 'accepted' and 'allowed' to buy a puppy, their original dog has died of old age [​IMG]

    If breeders still want control over the puppies they breed, do not advertise them to the general public for sale. They bred it, they can't keep it or do not want to keep it because it is not up to standard but they still want to have a say over what someone who has just paid over $500 does with it?


    [PS. I speak from experience in that I used to breed and show rough collies but gave it up a long time again due to the 'politics' in breeding circles and show rings].
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2015
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