Kits in the cold! Help, please!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by MrsKemmerlin, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. MrsKemmerlin

    MrsKemmerlin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 14, 2011
    Round O, SC
    Looking for some advice on keeping newborn kits thriving in the winter - we don't live anywhere too cold, but when you're used to the heat, cold is cold. So don't laugh when you see that we live in South Carolina [​IMG]

    One of my does just had a litter last night and we ended up losing a handful and I am blaming the unexpected drop in temp. They were buried down in hay and fur, so it's not like she left them out in the middle of everything, but it obviously didn't do the trick [​IMG]

    They are in an outdoor wire hutch. I have made some drapes from some old blankets to keep them out of the wind and a waterproof shade to keep the rain at bay - the adults seem content with the set up. However, with the loss of some kits, I have to find a solution to our less that stable temps - and with the quickness [​IMG] Losing the little dears is always heartbreaking.

    Any suggestions? Barn won't be built until later this year, so my option is to modify their current set up.

    THANK YOU!!!
     
  2. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady POOF Goes the Pooka

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    Nov 27, 2009
    Wilmington, NC
    Can you bring the litter indoors at night? That is what I learned to do when I decided I just couldn't stand to see one more dead litter. Some of my does have needed a bit of "educating" about this arrangement, but most just hop right in and nurse the kits when I bring the box out in the morning. When the temperature stays below 40o F all day, I may only leave the kits out until the mother gets done feeding them, they back into my hall closet they go - nest box and all.
     
  3. MrsKemmerlin

    MrsKemmerlin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 14, 2011
    Round O, SC
    I wondered if that was a possibility - I didn't know how the doe would react for me taking them and then bringing them back. If she would reject them, ignore them, etc. I believe I will have to try that - thank you for the idea!
     
  4. GuineaFowling

    GuineaFowling Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 3, 2013
    Central California
    If she does reject them, unlikely thought there is always the chance, you can bottle feed them kitten formula. My sister rescued a 2 week old baby bunny and she bottle fed it up to 8 weeks with kitten formula (vet recommended).
     

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