Large roundworm from egg to worm....

JDGreene

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I know this isn't "chicken roundworms" but probably close enough. Am I reading it takes 18 days to several weeks for eggs to turn into larvae then an additional 10-14 days to turn into roundworms?
 

Kiki

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I know this isn't "chicken roundworms" but probably close enough. Am I reading it takes 18 days to several weeks for eggs to turn into larvae then an additional 10-14 days to turn into roundworms?
It's not that simple...it varies greatly on the environment.

@casportpony Who is the lady that studies worms?
I cant think of her username for poop.
 

JDGreene

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Thank you for replying.

I was actually wondering why one waits specifically for 10-14 days to deworm again. I know the medicine does not work on the worm eggs and the worm lays thousands of eggs per day so the very day you deworm the chicken there should be fresh eggs in there the medicine does not kill.

So if it takes 18+ days for eggs to turn into larvae, then reinfection is pretty much guaranteed unless you deworm the second time after 18 days. Is my brain processing that correctly?
 

Sue Gremlin

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Thank you for replying.

I was actually wondering why one waits specifically for 10-14 days to deworm again. I know the medicine does not work on the worm eggs and the worm lays thousands of eggs per day so the very day you deworm the chicken there should be fresh eggs in there the medicine does not kill.

So if it takes 18+ days for eggs to turn into larvae, then reinfection is pretty much guaranteed unless you deworm the second time after 18 days. Is my brain processing that correctly?
This is a super good question. Roundworms in chickens spend their whole lives inside the gut, so when you give a dewormer, all stages present are exposed to the drug, and are susceptible to it. This is not true for many other worm species, but it is for these guys. They do, however, sometimes bury themselves in the intestinal lining, so when the adults are purged, they come out, thinking the coast is clear.
As for eggs in the environment, it takes a couple of weeks for them to develop to the infective stage. A fresh worm egg won't infect a bird, it has to go through a couple of moults before it can become infective.
 

ackie

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As for eggs in the environment, it takes a couple of weeks for them to develop to the infective stage. A fresh worm egg won't infect a bird, it has to go through a couple of moults before it can become infective
And this would be why you need a second round of wormer? because these eggs would be at the infective stage at this point and end up in the chicken? so you want to kill them before they lay eggs to break the cycle?

do the infective bits (eggs after several moults) that dont make it into a chicken die off? what's the time span on that?
 

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