Last Ditch Effort? Can you administer sulmet orally/individually and if so, how much per syringe?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PlantJoySeeds, May 29, 2012.

  1. That awful coryza that I'd brought home from the swap is now affecting my original flock, with five of them (out of six) showing pretty severe signs (all have rattley breathing, several have runny noses, two have pale droopy combs, and one has a closed eye). My neighbor suggested that they might pull out of it because of their age (7 mos) and because they 'had been' very healthy before exposure. He suggested that I administer the sulmet orally (because they're not interested in drinking the water at this point). He suggested 1/2 of a syringe and shooting it in each chicken's mouth. What do you think?? Is it worth a try and does that dose sound right to you?? I don't guess I have anything to lose at this point and if there is a chance that *any of them* could recover, I would be willing to just live with this flock and not introduce ANY MORE chickens to them until they end up all passing on eventually.

    Does this make any sense to anyone?? I just can't hardly stand the thought of killing them without trying to save them.[​IMG]
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    I am going to try to talk you out of this course of action. I know that you are devastated about this whole ordeal, and you aren't thinking straight right now because of this huge blow, but I am going to paint a brief picture of what life will be like having an infected flock.

    You may get them cleaned up this time, but then in the hottest part of the summer they are going to get stressed from the heat. One will get sick because any stress will cause them to become acutely ill again. You will treat that bird, get it well again, and then a few birds will start molting. They will get ill, and will need to be treated. Then winter will come...the whole flock will get ill and need treatment. By now, you are starting to notice how much money and time you are spending to treat them. You aren't getting hardly any eggs that aren't being discarded because the birds are constantly being treated and you can't eat the eggs. You will likely end up having a few kept in the house during the winter because they are too ill to be outside, and some may die despite all you are doing to treat the outbreaks as they occur. This time next year, you will be very discouraged and probably resent all the time, effort and money you are pumping into this flock. Any fond feelings for poultry keeping will have long fled, but you will continue to care for the birds because you feel guilty about them getting sick in the first place. You will watch them suffer, getting sick over and over, and never get anything back from it.

    A sick flock takes all the joy out of poultry keeping. If you want to hear first-hand about the devastation that caring for a sick flock entails send a PM to Foxypoproxy, or check out some of her old posts.

    I am sorry you have found yourself in this situation. Treatment for respiratory ailments is generally Tylan 50. It is an injectable medication given for 3 days at a time, I believe. You will need to keep a stock of it on hand if you decide to treat your flock.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
     
  3. Thanks, CMV. <sigh> Yes, I guess I already know that in the deepest part of me, but I just haven't been able to convince myself, yet, that there was NO HOPE and that I should give up on them. ;( I just wish I could take it all back, and never set foot on a **** swap meet...and of course, I know I can't.

    And with no hope. and trying to think logically and rationally, I'll need to move forward and, and, and, I'll need to* find* someone to kill and dispose of the chickens, too...and I'm just not looking forward to any of it. Someone came over and culled the first 3 birds the day before yesterday, but the way he did it seemed cruel (he beat their heads with a board)...and I hope I could find a more humane way to end their lives..these that we know and love. :(

    How do you all do cull when necessary? I mean, what method is the quickest and most humane? And do you have any suggestions on finding someone who has the stomach for it and would be willing to do it for me? I was thinking, perhaps, someone who is a hunter??
     
  4. CSisley

    CSisley Chirping

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    I'm very sorry for your loss. If you are planning to put them down I would suggest a small ax with a chopping block. It's a little gruesome but it's an extremely quick and humane way for them to die. Anything you see after the ax meets the block is just reflex not pain. You'll have to find someone that can do it accurately and without hesitation.
     
  5. featherz

    featherz Veggie Chick

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    I'd use tylan instead of sulmet, as previously mentioned, if you decide to treat.

    As for culling, I've had to do it twice - once for an internal layer and once for a horrible case of wet fowl pox. The way I do it is with a broomstick - the method is shown on youtube, but it is quick and easy to do for someone with less upper body strength - you gently lay them on the ground, put a dowel over the neck (at this point they will be very calm), stand over each end of the stick and pull up on the feet. They will flap, but will be gone at this point. No blood and it's over. If you want the youtube link I will find for you.
     
  6. Yes, please...and thank you. I still don't know if *I* will be able to do it, but I'll watch and see. I really just need to be able to make myself look at this differently...you know the whole, "When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change" thing? I guess if I am going to keep chickens, sometimes bad things like this *will* happen and I need to be able to handle it myself :I( Now...if I can just get my heart to follow my brain.
     
  7. featherz

    featherz Veggie Chick

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    Here it is - two different people:





    May require you to sign in to youtube and shows actual procedure.
     
  8. Oh, lordy. I just don't think I can do it. It does look more humane and there's no blood...both huge, but I'm just going to have to get someone else to do it, I think. Thanks for finding and sharing the videos. Maybe it'll be possible for me to show the videos to someone who has the stomach to do it FOR me. :(
     
  9. featherz

    featherz Veggie Chick

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    I know the feeling. My DH won't do it for me and he's the meat eater in the house =(. It's easier for me if they are truly suffering, as both my birds were. If my birds ever came down with something respiratory that wasn't causing obvious suffering I too would have a tough time with it. =( It's your decision - either get the tylan and treat, then just keep in mind the carrier problem and never let any new birds in or out (and that includes hatching eggs) , or cull and start fresh.
     

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