Laying hens with "water belly" or "ascites"?

Janice123456

Chirping
Aug 16, 2015
65
15
81
brockton mass
Shes getting 1 mg approximately of lasix. Ya that is a small amount. Amazing this helps her so much. Im thinking this would help my hen. I don't feel any egg inside only fluid. How did your vet decide this was the med she needed? Xray etc
 
Last edited:

Blueangelical

Hatching
Nov 9, 2015
1
0
8
Hi, this is my first post, I'm a long term viewer of BYC, had hens for about 5 years.

After reading the posts I'm pretty sure this is Dropsy, (Ascities), see what you think..

Hen gone from normal to this overnight. We googled it and it fitted egg bound symptoms. Separated her and put her in a large cage in the house, bathing her in warm water, to get things moving, tried the lubed and gloved finger down the vent thing, couldn't feel an egg. Kept her inside, next day still same. Put her back with others and she's eating normal, running around, poohing normal and isn't in distress. Not laying but neither are few others because of time if year. Nothing untoward in pooh. Noticed abdomen is getting more swollen, walking like penguin.

what do you think she has please.



 

Shabana

Songster
6 Years
Jul 31, 2013
801
178
158
South Yorkshire, England
My Coop
My Coop
Heya
Boots stood a bit like this, but more kinda like a cowboy legs apart. I've read it's more like a penguin when its internal laying. I've read that if you drain your hen and it's clear (colour of urine) it's ascites and if it's cloudy it's egg yolk peritonitis. I don't think she's egg bound. She will be very uncomfortable and draining her will make her much more comfortable but as with most things there is a risk. That said she can't go on like she is.

I drained boots before taking her to the vet and the vet listened to what she was like before and agreed with me that it was ascites.
My vet is not an avian vet but was happy to read up and do her best. After her exam they thought it might be brought on because of a heart condition. She is 8 so that makes sense. Without her frusol her fluid would return, because of her underlying condition.

Good luck to you both.
Draining them is easier and less traumatic than you might think. Gravity does the job once you've popped the needle in a couple of times (I did three punctures on Boots ). Follow the instructions in this thread carefully and then let her drain in the bath or sink. Keep her warm.

Best wishes xx
 

chickendreams24

Crowing
Jul 30, 2015
3,399
2,536
357
Wisconsin, USA
I will try to get some today.  I let the chicks and their mom out last week, and she did not stay with them at night.  First thing, one of them got eaten.  :(   Or at least I guess so, because he disappeared.  We're thinking the skunk again.  Anyway, I think the three remaining are hens.  One almost certainly is, she has the same coloring as her mother, exactly.  Stand by for more.
 

chicknmania

Crowing
13 Years
Jan 26, 2007
5,658
913
382
central Ohio
Quote:Thanks, so far, they are. It's been so dark and dreary when I am out there, and they haven't been out..but tomorrow's supposed to be a nicer day. I will try to remember to bring my phone, I'm so bad about that! Thanks for being patient. :)
 

chicknmania

Crowing
13 Years
Jan 26, 2007
5,658
913
382
central Ohio
Quote:It really depends on the individual and what the problem is.. We drained Bitsy in April or May, I think it was... and then again in September...but she badly needed it again when she was killed. Draining really didn't bother Bitsy at all.. but some report that it made their hen sick for a day or so. We always gave Bitsy a dose of Baytril the day before, then a dose on subsequent days for the next two or three days...and we kept her by herself in a hospital pen to recover...but I don't know if you need to do the antibiotic, we just did it as a precaution against infection. I didn't like to do it either, but fortunately I have a couple of different friends who are in the medical profession. You might discover that you have a friend like that too..or anyone who has experience with a needle, even someone who has to inject themselves for diabetes..would probably do it for you. It isn't difficult, I'm just squeamish, and it's nice to make it a two person job, for support. My two friends who helped me with Bitsy both became instantly attached to her, lol, so they didn't mind helping.
 

Janice123456

Chirping
Aug 16, 2015
65
15
81
brockton mass
So I drained my hen 500 mL came out of her belly it looked a little slightly pink-ish but get it could be also called clear it really reminded me of thin egg whites I I put her on antibiotics amoxicillin I guess I wasn't sure that was the right antibiotics to put her own I'm very glad I finally got the bravery up to drain her it was actually pretty easy she just llay down and let me drain her belly and really didn't move though she's definitely much happier and running around. I guess I'm just worried that she will not recover fully.
I put a large gauge needle probably about 2 inches below her vent to the left just below the skin but I did not put it straight and I put it so it just went under the skin so I would not poking anything underneath. Then I just attached a syringe and pullback 500 mL which is a lot of fluid
 

Shabana

Songster
6 Years
Jul 31, 2013
801
178
158
South Yorkshire, England
My Coop
My Coop
Hope she's feeling better and doing ok. It is scary when you do it the first time.
Because an underlying condition causes this you will need to watch out for the fluid returning and consider using preventatives like lasix milk thistle or frusol to keep it at bay.

Best wishes to you both and great job !
 
Top Bottom