leghorns and golden comets

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by henhaus, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. henhaus

    henhaus New Egg

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    Mar 1, 2012
    I am thinking about expanding my flock. I currently have 3 leghorns and 3 golden comets, all hens. In November, a neighbor found a leghorn rooster and thought it was one of mine. They put it in with my girls when I wasn't home, and the next day I found the rooster dead, and was never able to find out who it belonged to. The only thing I can think of is that he was "hen pecked" to death. I would like to add silkies, polish, or americaunas. I am afraid that if I add a new member to the flock that it will get pecked to death too. Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated.
     
  2. evenstargirl

    evenstargirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Hmm, well, introducing new members to a flock should be done gradually and under supervision.

    For all you know, the rooster might have been sick or already near death.
     
  3. CSWolffe

    CSWolffe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, you should be aware that breeds with unusual feathering, like Silkies, Polish, and Amaraucanas, are more prone to having their feathers pulled out.
    Don't know why, seems to offend some chickens sensibilities, as if they realize the other chicken is different somehow and they don't like it. Once they start pulling the odd looking feathers, it's a short step to plucking them bald, and finally pecking them bloody and death.
     
  4. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree. I think it would be rather difficult to catch a healthy Leghorn rooster, especially if it not confined to a pen. I'm sure you know they're fast and good fliers.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    IF you decide to get new birds, quarantine them away from your flock for at least 30 days.
     

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