Letting hen hatch some eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by SuburbanChickFarmer, Sep 4, 2008.

  1. SuburbanChickFarmer

    SuburbanChickFarmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 22, 2008
    I am thinking about letting one hen hatch some eggs and have a question or two. I currently have my hens all mixed with two roos, a Light Brahma and a Welsummer. Can I remove the Welsummer hen and roo, let them be a couple for a while, and she will hatch Welsummer chicks instead of mixed breeds? Probably a stupid question but I know you would never let a pure bred dog breed with a mongrel then with one of its own kind and wind up with pure bred dogs. Do chickens work this way too? Obviously I am very new to all of this!
     
  2. sussexgal

    sussexgal Chillin' With My Peeps

    Separate your hens for a couple weeks before breeding pure. I've read everything from a few days - to a month.... but of all I've read, a few weeks is the most consistent. Roo sperm lives quite awhile.
     
  3. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/pubs/is1610.htm

    &quot
    ; Following mating, sperm enter the hen's oviduct and are stored within sperm storage glands. Only sperm that can swim will enter these sperm storage sites. These glands can store more than half a million sperm. Sperm can remain alive in these glands and fertilize eggs for up to 3 weeks.

    A hen will have maximum fertility for only about 3 to 4 days after one mating. For this reason, the male-to-female ratio in a flock must be enough to ensure mating of every hen every 3 days or so. Sperm do not break through the eggshell. Instead they travel up the oviduct to the infundibulum to join with the egg yolk."
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2008
  4. Quail_Antwerp

    Quail_Antwerp [IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG]Mrs

    Aug 16, 2008
    Ohio
    Quote:I don't understand this, how would the pure bred dog bred back to its own breed NOT produce pure bred pups? The mongrel's genetic make up does not stay in the dog after the pups are born. The purebred is still a purebred, and bred to another purebred would produce purebred. I know it is a common belief that the dog would be ruined, but scientifically, and genetically, it wouldn't be.

    Now with your chickens, then hen is fertile for a week or two after mating with a roo. If you want Welsummer chicks, then yes, separate your two chickens and collect her eggs for a week or two. After she has only been with your welsummer roo for a week or so, and not any other roos, then you should get purbred Welsummer chicks.

    Goodluck with your hatching!! [​IMG]
     
  5. ashyannehand

    ashyannehand Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 25, 2008
    Wade, Mississippi
    I just wanted to say good luck! [​IMG]
    Many happy babies to you! [​IMG]
     
  6. walkswithdog

    walkswithdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Well. That, my friend is a very, very old, leftover and dead wives tale. One breeding of a purebred, to another breed, makes one litter of mutts.

    It never, ever affects other litters, if the purebred is then mated to a purebred, all the following pups are purebred. (Unless the grump also carried brucellosis. In which case the male becomes sterile or throws off sperm and infects all following grump he's mated to.) Too much information - I know, can't help it.

    In the deep dark past people confused about procreation held onto the myth that a misbreeding somehow affected a next breeding. It's not possible. There never was any scientific or real basis for it.

    So once you've isolated your purebred chickens for enough time they'll produce purebred eggs.

    It's easier than some folks ever made it out to be.
     
  7. walkswithdog

    walkswithdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As an aside. If a female purebred dog, bred to both another breed of dog and also a purebred male dog, producing a litter from both, some would be purebred (and could be DNA tested as such) and some would be mutts.

    In instances where a purebred grump has been accidentally cross bred, many owners of show and working dogs do DNA the litter.

    Some working dog and show owner's even go so far as to use multiple purebred dogs for sires of a litter. It can ensure higher viable numbers and DNA will sort out which papers go with which pup.

    How's that for information you didn't ask for... Omg somebody stop me...
     
  8. SuburbanChickFarmer

    SuburbanChickFarmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 22, 2008
    Thanks everyone. Not only have I been enlightened on breeding pure breed dogs (which I have no interest in, chicks are enough!!) I now realize how easy it will be for me to breed my Welsummers. I just picked up a seperate little coop that someone else had outgrown so now my Welsummer have their own little apartment! Hopefully we will have some little Welsummers!! [​IMG]
     

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