Lighting question.

smokinjay

In the Brooder
8 Years
Aug 11, 2011
98
3
29
I am over half way done with my coop inside measurments are 4x8x4 painted white. My Birds are 2 weeks out and will be of age to lay mid Dec. What kind of lighting and how much whould you put in? ( 2 south faceing window 26"x26" and another one on the east side)
 

sabianshepherds

Chirping
8 Years
Jun 2, 2011
132
0
89
Cleveland
I agonized over this for months, until I came out one night for the dogs and realised that my backyard lights (4 spotlights) shine right into both sides of the coop (I had just put in windows on all sides). I had the problem of so much light they couldn't sleep. I put a 7 day timer on the backyard lights and my problem is solved.
 

LiLRedCV

Songster
9 Years
Aug 25, 2010
589
11
118
Land of the Rain
We have corrugated clear panels on the roof of the coop we built last summer and with the shed kit we're building and converting, we're making 1/2 of that roof (south facing with nests on the north side of the shed) with them too. We're not running electricity to new coop tho'. Too expensive, so might do a couple of those solar paneled yard lights that turn on when it detects movement of either side of the East (our door) and West (their door) facing walls so if we're out there at night or predators roam too close they'll automatically turn on.
 

Ridgerunner

Free Ranging
11 Years
Feb 2, 2009
25,281
14,654
727
Southeast Louisiana
From your other thread, I believe you are talking about supplemental light to get them to lay this winter, not regular light from windows, though I am not sure. If you want to provide the extra light for winter laying, all you need is enough light so you can read a newspaper in there at night. It does not take a bright light. I think they are a little calmer if the light is not too bright anyway. Putting a small wattage bulb on a timer is a great way to go about this.

I don't provide supplemental light, but let mine have the downtime to recharge their system. After a long time of laying without the break they get from a molt, the egg shells can get lighter colored and they can reduce the frequency of laying. But I don't generally have pullets coming into lay around Christmas like you do.

As far as windows, I just have one. It's on the north side since that is the only outside wall I built for my coop. All I was after was enough light so I can see when I am in there working. I did put in a single incandescent light for when I go in there at night to count them or work in there. That comes in real handy. A couple of outlets is a real good idea too for a walk-in coop, but that's necessary for one the size of yours. With your coop, just a regular nightlight may be enough to extend the laying, or maybe get yours started, plus allow you to see in there at night.
 

EweSheep

Flock Mistress
13 Years
Jan 12, 2007
21,908
123
418
Land of Lincoln
I agree with Ridgerunner, I don't want to "burn out" my hens before their time nor need to have them lay for more than 300 to 350 eggs a year. I would give them a break when they molt, rest and up the protein and they last alot longer than the ones that needs the light on them constantly and longer.
 

smokinjay

In the Brooder
8 Years
Aug 11, 2011
98
3
29
Quote:Yep its the pullets I am worryed about. (Lots of windows but most days is very dark here in Dec. to) It gets really cold here as well with full wind.
 
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MIKE555444

Songster
10 Years
Jun 8, 2009
959
74
143
Pliny, West Virgina
If you are providing light to increase the hens days then you can add a outlet and a timer like this. This timer is set to turn the light on about an hour before daylight on off in about an hours after daylight.

 
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smokinjay

In the Brooder
8 Years
Aug 11, 2011
98
3
29
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