limping baby frizzle 8 weeks help...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kathyb, Jan 13, 2008.

  1. kathyb

    kathyb New Egg

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    Nov 30, 2007
    I have an 8 week old baby frizzle that has just started to limp.. It doesn't appear to be broken..she is dragging the
    limp leg behind her. I also have another baby same age which is fine...both still attached to mum..I am thinking that
    she may have caught it in the fence as they can still slip
    through the holes in the wire fence...any solution....
     
  2. fallenweeble

    fallenweeble Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 4, 2007
    hi kathyb,
    i'm a newbie and there are many many more folks here with more experience whom i'm sure will be along with some info shortly.
    just off the top of my head tho i would say to check the top of the dragging foot often to make sure she isn't developing a wound where the foot is scraping the ground. that sort of thing can get infected and create even more problems then she already has.

    i have a rescue roo who has only one "good" leg and he does pretty darn good with what he has. i do keep an eye on the "bad" leg to make sure he isn't getting sores etc. on it but so far so good!

    when i took my roo in to see the vet she suggested i take the leg through "normal" movements a couple of times each day. that is to gently extend/flex the leg the way the chicken naturally does while walking just to keep the muscles and tendons from retracting. perhaps it might be okay to do this with your chick (gently!!!!!) until the problem is resolved or until you know more about what, ultimately, will happen with that leg.
    hopefully someone with more experience will come along and let us know if this is recommended for a chick or not.

    good luck and please post updates.
     
  3. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    I would separate and restrict movement...in this way perhaps giving the leg the rest it may need to heal and better able to monitor any other specific details of symptom.
     

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