little tikes log cabin

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by dcasey, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. dcasey

    dcasey Hatching

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    Jul 28, 2010
    Cohasset, MA
    Hi Everyone, I just joined BYC and I'm a first time chicken owner. We finished our coop and run last weekend and the chickens seem to love it. Originally, the log cabin was intended as a summer coop, but I'm wondering if they will be okay in it for the winter. Any suggestions?

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  2. joletabey

    joletabey SDWD!!!!

    Apr 9, 2009
    western NC
    WELCOME!!!! You will love it here!
    Your whole set up is too darn cute!!! I love that little fire. Just make sure it is draft free in the winter- looks like it is well protected in your run area. Do you have hardware cloth aproned or dug into the ground on the outside of the run?

    I would LOVE to find one of those. . . . .
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2010
  3. The Tinman

    The Tinman Songster

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    Jun 10, 2010
    Fairfield County CT
    I`m going to say no. I don`t think they will be warm enough come winter time.
     
  4. dcasey

    dcasey Hatching

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    Jul 28, 2010
    Cohasset, MA
    Thanks. We put paver stones in trench surrounding the run with a hardware cloth apron and all around the pen. I also put hardware cloth on all openings on the cabin. I put some blown insulation in the hollow plastic thinking that may make it warmer in the winter. Need to do some planting around the pen and fill in the holes in the roof so water/snow won't accumulate in the pen. Will monitor temperature in the cabin to see if it is winter-worthy, but plan on having a Plan B in case it doesn't work out. Has anyone else out there used one of these little tikes houses in New England over the winter? Would love to hear from you.
     

  5. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    I'm neither on the East Coast nor have I used my Little Tykes playhouse over winter yet. I just wanted to chime in that I've transmorgrified one (a Barbie playhouse) into a coop for four of my flock: two bantams and two LF are using it as "home base." (Silver Sebright, Golden Sebright, a Delaware and an EE.)

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    Here are the occupants before the coop transition was completed, but they were staying in it anyway. The coop is one of five coop buildings of various kinds - it's the only Little Tykes playhouse, though - inside the entire run enclosure.

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    And here's their raised feeder and nipple waterer, visible through the little "chicken door."
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  6. teach1rusl

    teach1rusl Love My Chickens

    I was going to make a crack about that fire keeping them plenty warm, but I'll resist... [​IMG] If the plastic is filled with insulation, that certainly will help. I might see how things go this winter...you can always tie tarps and such up around your run to stop wind. Obviously you'll need to put plexiglass or something over the windows, since they're right there at the roost (cold drafts [​IMG] ). Do you have any ventilation elsewhere up high, besides the windows???
    Actually I was wondering whether you'll have enough roost space (once they're grown, not now when they're little guys). Ideally, you'll have about 10-12 inches of roost space per adult bird. Your run is wonderful!!
     
  7. dcasey

    dcasey Hatching

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    Jul 28, 2010
    Cohasset, MA
    Linda - love your coop! Teach1 - I have one roost that is four feet and another that is three feet. I have six five-week-old chicks and was wondering, too, about the space. It'll be cozy, but it might also make it warmer from their body heat. Will definitely need to close up the windows with plexiglass or something solid like that. The roof line has small place that serves as ventilation and is also protected from the elements. I think the ventiliation is fine - it's the drafts from the windows that would be problematic, I think. Thanks so much for the feedback, I really appreciate it!
     

  8. The Tinman

    The Tinman Songster

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    Jun 10, 2010
    Fairfield County CT
    Ok now knowing you are blowing insulation into the hollow log and you do something with the door it should be ok.
     
  9. CoyoteMagic

    CoyoteMagic RIP ?-2014

    Drill some little holes around the bottom just big enough for the hose of that spray in expandable insulation. It will expand and fill the empty air space between the walls. The tricky part is going to be finding someting to stop the drafts that come in at the corner joints where the sides connect. I've used old political signs folded in half and screw on with drywall screws and a washer. Does great. I covered the open part of the door with plywood and just used the lower to access it.
     

  10. dcasey

    dcasey Hatching

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    Jul 28, 2010
    Cohasset, MA
    Thanks Tinman and Coyote. I have just today put plywood door on top with the plastic door still on the bottom (would have preferred one solid door to cover the plastic half door - may still do this). On the inside of the four corners I screwed hardware cloth covered with wood and then on the outside of the corners filled the spaces with insulation to tighten up any gaps or drafts. I have blown the insulation into the walls but not the roof. Do you think that is necessary?
     

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