Local Newspaper just interviewed me - Update 10/7 and Story!!

ZooMummzy

Queen of the Zoo
11 Years
Mar 31, 2008
5,392
27
261
Philomath, Oregon
A reporter found me from my Craigslist ad selling eggs and wanted to know if she could interview me for an article being written on backyard chicken flocks. It was my first ever interview, I was nervous and I probably talked too much, lol like I always do when I talk about my chickens, but I could tell she wasn't really "into" the story so I was a bit disappointed. It seemed like it was just a job for her, but hopefully it will turn out ok. I'm pretty sure she thinks I'm crazy when I told her why I wanted chickens. I guess saying I woke up one morning and said "I want chickens" wasn't exactly what she was looking for
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It's true though! I think me saying they were my pets surprised her too. I wouldn't tell her how many chickens I had since I'm 20 over my allowed permit...not sure she liked that either but oh well
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I was excited that BYC will get mentioned in the article. She mentioned she had been looking at the site a lot and I brought it up as a place to find really good information for backyard flocks of all types. I'll make sure I post a link to the article when it's published next week.
 
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ZooMummzy

Queen of the Zoo
11 Years
Mar 31, 2008
5,392
27
261
Philomath, Oregon
I finally remembered to check the newspaper for the article I was interviewed for a few weeks ago. It's an "ok" story (she was pretty out to lunch as a reporter...didn't really care what I was saying)....she put my quote about Chicken TV under someone else's name and she misquoted what I said about them being pets (I said they were my pets and even my daughter was getting into them now after hating them at first), but I'm just glad it was a positive article about chickens.





City Chickens
Corvallis Gazette Times
October 4, 2009


When Kate and Dennis Rivera moved to the mid-valley from southern California three years ago, they were looking for certain things: a slower pace of life. A place with a little bit of land. A chance to grow their own food.

And chickens.

"I think chickens were always part of the picture," Kate said.

"This is Step One," said Dennis, looking out at the five Plymouth barred rocks pecking in the back yard of their North Albany home. "Maybe someday we'll have some place bigger and do more, but for now, chickens are all we can handle." On one side of the yard, where the chickens roam, free to peck at weeds, bugs and slugs, runs a busy road. On the other sides are not open fields, but fences and neighboring houses. With a .4-acre lot, the Riveras and their hens have more room to roam than some city dwellers, but it's not a sprawling farm by a long shot.

The Riveras are joining the growing ranks of urban and suburban residents around the country who are not content to let raising their own food pass them by just because the have a smaller space to work with.

While serious urban farming enthusiasts may gather at online message boards to virtually discuss their bee-keeping and cheese-making, most devotees of urban farming start simple: with a vegetable garden and a few chickens.

At Denson's Feed in Corvallis, they've been taking orders for chicks every spring since 1985, but in the past few years the number of orders has steadily increased, owner Casey Denson said.

"More people want to know where their eggs are coming from," he said. "I've seen more people getting into gardening and wanting to know where their food is grown the past few years too. It's a back to the basics kind of thing."

Karmyn Raisl of Albany said she enjoys the better flavor and thicker, darker-yellow yolks of the eggs of her backyard flocks. She also likes knowing that the eggs she feeds her children come from healthy chickens.

"I know exactly what's going into my chickens," she said. "With eggs from a grocery store, you never know."

Most chicken owners say they didn't expect to enjoy their feathered friends so much.

"Maybe our lives are just really boring," Raisl said. "But digging up a worm and feeding it to the chickesn-that can be the highlight of our day."

The Riveras said each of their birds has a personality-one pecks at everything, another is the boss of the flock. Though to an outsider the birds may look identical, the Riveras can tell them all apart. "We're out here every day just watching them," she said. "It's Chicken TV."

Laura Castle of Philomath said her chickens are like family pets, with the added bonus of fresh eggs. "When I first got them, my daughter hated them," she said. "Now, they're her pets. Easiest pets ever."
 

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