Looking for advice with my chicken coop build

Mthawkins08

In the Brooder
Dec 20, 2020
15
3
14
I have 11 chickens and looking at around 8x8 or a little less for the coop (they'll have a large run too)
I picked up some concrete blocks from home depot and stacked 4 corners up two high (about 12 to 16 inches above ground) with one stack supporting the center.
I picked up a stack of free pallets and doors, both the same length.
I'm considering using 3 doors as the floor, and one door on the back attached to a bracket for opening and closing to clean, while the pallet wood will be for the rest of the walls.
How would you connect the three doors being used as the floor together?and I assume it's safe to sit on the concrete blocks without being connected considering the weight.
 

Mthawkins08

In the Brooder
Dec 20, 2020
15
3
14
20201227_154552.jpg

I. Ljld also stacked the pallets two high
 

3KillerBs

Enabler
12 Years
Jul 10, 2009
10,609
27,140
1,066
North Carolina Sandhills
My Coop
My Coop
8x8 = 64 square feet, so a nice, generous size for 11 birds.

I absolutely would NOT fail to secure your doors to the blocks and to each other. A bad foundation is a building collapse waiting to happen. :(

Also, you need to turn your blocks the other way so that they're sitting with the hollows vertically instead of horizontally or replace them with solid blocks. The sides have comparatively little strength for supporting the weight of a building.

I could go get photos of a shed on our property that wasn't put on correct blocks so that you could see the crushed concrete that has caused our shed to tilt. We're going to have to have it moved and reset because the shed mover used hollow blocks sideways. :(
 

Mthawkins08

In the Brooder
Dec 20, 2020
15
3
14
8x8 = 64 square feet, so a nice, generous size for 11 birds.

I absolutely would NOT fail to secure your doors to the blocks and to each other. A bad foundation is a building collapse waiting to happen. :(

Also, you need to turn your blocks the other way so that they're sitting with the hollows vertically instead of horizontally or replace them with solid blocks. The sides have comparatively little strength for supporting the weight of a building.

I could go get photos of a shed on our property that wasn't put on correct blocks so that you could see the crushed concrete that has caused our shed to tilt. We're going to have to have it moved and reset because the shed mover used hollow blocks sideways. :(
Thanks for the tip on the blocks! I'll flip them then. I still need to balance them out and secure the flooring anyways. I assume screwing the flooring in with angles would be enough to secure them together?
 

aart

Chicken Juggler!
Premium Feather Member
9 Years
Nov 27, 2012
100,686
143,845
1,867
SW Michigan
My Coop
My Coop
How would you connect the three doors being used as the floor together?
I would not recommend using doors as floor sheathing,
even if there was substantial framing under it.

My suggestion is to watch a few (many) videos on building a shed before starting.
Ditto Dat!

Oh, and.... Welcome to BYC! @Mthawkins08
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1609108578309.png
 

Mthawkins08

In the Brooder
Dec 20, 2020
15
3
14
My suggestion is to watch a few (many) videos on building a shed before starting.

You need floor framing in order to attempt to use doors as sheeting. If those are hallow core doors they would be better used on a wall.
They're solid doors. I might pick up a few more concrete bricks to hold up some areas in the middle before leveling and connecting them together. They're pretty decent solid doors
 

21hens-incharge

Moderator
BYC Staff
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Mar 9, 2014
26,752
111,161
1,722
Northern Colorado
They're solid doors. I might pick up a few more concrete bricks to hold up some areas in the middle before leveling and connecting them together. They're pretty decent solid doors

It's good that they are solid doors. Less places for creepy crawly mites and lice to hide. I think as a floor they would make cleaning difficult.

You still need floor framing. You could use pallets for that part but it IS essential to frame the base.

Many people have the coop with no floor which if done correctly is still very sturdy. Look at a horse run in shelter for example or a pole barn. Those have dirt floors and stand strong when built correctly.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom