Managing deworming of large flocks

Chickerella2012

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Jun 27, 2019
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Tallahassee, FL
I have been looking for a dewormer that goes into the drinking water.
As of now, the only thing affordable enough, and easy enough, to treat 12 separate breeding flocks on a monthly basis (more preventative than anything), is pyrantel pamoate suspension 50mg.
I run fecal floats at home, and I do not like treating for something that may not be there. But, I would like to start my penned up Breeder Flocks on a dewormer schedule. Once monthly would be what I'd like to do. Is pyrantel paomate suspension the only thing out there that is affordable and easy to dose via drinking water?
I've looked at Safeguard Aquasol, but that is not feasible for me. Most dewormers need 5 day treatments, the PP being only two days. I don't mind an egg withdrawal. I just really need something that is easily obtained, measured and administered by water.
Thank you for any help in advance!
 

aart

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I run fecal floats at home, and I do not like treating for something that may not be there.
So have you found indications of a worm load?

Would help to know @Chickerella2012 ....
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
1608655579609.png


administered by water.
I don't think there is one.
@dawg53 would know.
 

Chickerella2012

Songster
Jun 27, 2019
137
96
101
Tallahassee, FL
So have you found indications of a worm load?

Would help to know @Chickerella2012 ....
Where in this world are you located?
Climate, and time of year, is almost always a factor.
Please add your general geographical location to your profile.
It's easy to do, and then it's always there!
View attachment 2459695


I don't think there is one.
@dawg53 would know.
When I had a bird acting somewhat strange, I brought him in and ran a fecal. Found large round worm eggs. I don't have many internal parasites that cause trouble here. But I rather be safe and treat the flocks. I cannot treat each bird orally, at around 150 heads, that would be too costly to do and quite time consuming as well.
 

dawg53

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When I had a bird acting somewhat strange, I brought him in and ran a fecal. Found large round worm eggs. I don't have many internal parasites that cause trouble here. But I rather be safe and treat the flocks. I cannot treat each bird orally, at around 150 heads, that would be too costly to do and quite time consuming as well.
Levamisole. See post #5 in this link:
https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/levamisole.1395648/#post-22910551

Here's where you can buy it:
https://www.jefferspet.com/products/levamed-soluble-drench-powder-dewormer-52-gram
 

Folly's place

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The only approved drug here is fenbendazole, and there's no egg withdrawal.
Another approach to this issue involves reducing exposure to this parasite, if possible. Also, select birds who manage with a small worm load, eliminating any who are overwhelmed. In other words, breed for resistance to your roundworm problem.
Worming with anything on a monthly schedule promotes parasite resistance in the targeted parasites, especially when you will have birds ingesting sublethal drug amounts because you are using a product in their drinking water. Definitely not best!
Florida, with no annual freeze cycle, is a happy place for many parasites, and you may need to do something occasionally anyway. But, birds get sick for many reasons besides intestinal worm burdens.
Here I won't use any bird who's been ill, except for a predator attack, in my breeding pens.
Mary
 

Folly's place

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The most expensive approved drug is fenbendazole in Aquasol (sp?) meant to be used in drinking water.
If your birds are in different pens, it would be easier to treat smaller groups at once, so you could treat each bird individually. And see if your parasite load is the same everywhere, or not.
Mary
 

dawg53

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The only approved drug here is fenbendazole, and there's no egg withdrawal.
Another approach to this issue involves reducing exposure to this parasite, if possible. Also, select birds who manage with a small worm load, eliminating any who are overwhelmed. In other words, breed for resistance to your roundworm problem.
Worming with anything on a monthly schedule promotes parasite resistance in the targeted parasites, especially when you will have birds ingesting sublethal drug amounts because you are using a product in their drinking water. Definitely not best!
Florida, with no annual freeze cycle, is a happy place for many parasites, and you may need to do something occasionally anyway. But, birds get sick for many reasons besides intestinal worm burdens.
Here I won't use any bird who's been ill, except for a predator attack, in my breeding pens.
Mary
What is a small wormload? How many worm eggs are deposited on the soil in feces from one female large roundworm in one day? It's enough to infect a whole flock of chickens. Can your dog or you live with a small wormload?
You live way up north, so you dont have to deal with worms that much. Move down here and you'll sing a different tune or end up culling your whole flock.
 

casportpony

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The most expensive approved drug is fenbendazole in Aquasol (sp?) meant to be used in drinking water.
No need to buy AquaSol, you can use the cheaper liquid for goats, cows, & horses, but instead of in the water, you need to give it orally or in a mash.
 

Folly's place

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I agree, and did say that Florida is not the same as places with actual winters. I'd still use fenbendazole if necessary.
And health recommendations change over time, and vary a bit for different species.
Mary
 

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