Maple Sugaring: Making Soft Maple Candy

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by frugal, Apr 25, 2009.

  1. frugal

    frugal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our Maple Sugaring season ended last week. We had a good year making 75 gallons of Pure Vermont Maple Syrup. We also took the time to make some Granulated Maple Sugar as well as this soft Maple Candy.

    From page 192 of the North American Maple Syrup Producers Manual produced by Ohio State University.
    To prepare molded sugar, heat syrup to 32°F to 34°F (18°C to 19°C) above the boiling point of water. Then cool the pan of cooked syrup to at least 200°F (93°C) but not below 160°F (71°C). The thick syrup should then be stirred, either by hand with a large spoon or with a commercial maple sugar machine. The lower the temperature to which the syrup is cooled before stirring, the finer (smaller) will be the sugar crystals formed in the candy. However, large batches of candy are commonly cooled only to approximately 200°F (93°C) or higher, because when cooled to lower temperatures it becomes almost impossible to mold the entire batch before it becomes too stiff.

    When stirring, the syrup solution must be watched carefully as it becomes lighter in color, somewhat thicker, and eventually has a creamy opaque appearance. At this critical stage the syrup has lost some of its gloss and appears paste-like. This is the result of the formation of many tiny sugar crystals that form and increase in size in response to the agitation of the syrup. Stirring will only take a few minutes, usually less than five. It is important to determine the exact moment to pour the syrup into the molds. If the mixture is stirred too long the thickened syrup will “set up” (harden) in the pan. It’s best to err on the early side.

    While the sugar is still soft and plastic, pour or pack it into rubber or metal molds of different shapes. If packing the molds is necessary, use a wide-blade putty knife or spatula. When using a maple candy machine, the semi-liquid sugar can be poured directly into molds without packing or leveling. Use a rigid support under rubber molds to prevent them from flexing. Place molds on a rack to cool; the individual pieces can be removed within 10 to 30 minutes. Sugar formed by pouring rather than packing has an attractive glazed surface. Fresh maple candies can be stored in cool dry conditions for a few months.

    Let's get started!

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    Here's what you'll need.
    Some molds, Maple Syrup, Spoon and something to Pour with.


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    First heat up your Maple Syrup to the temperature that water boils at plus 32° F - 34° F.
    Water boils at 212° F on my homestead so my target zone in between 244° F and 246° F.


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    I've reached my target zone at 245° F.

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    Before cooling I transfer the Maple Syrup into a pitcher to pour into my molds more easily.

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    I'm cooling the Maple Syrup down in a sink full of cold mountain water.

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    When the syrup cools down to 200° F. I remove the pitcher from the cold water.

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    And then I slowly begin to stir the syrup.

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    Until it reaches the proper consistency.

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    And then pour...

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    and pour...

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    as quickly as you are able before the syrup hardens in the pitcher!

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    They set up very quickly.

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    Almost ready.

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    Time to remove them from the molds and let them cool.

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    Pure Maple Candy!

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  2. b.hromada

    b.hromada Flock Mistress

    Wow! Those look good [​IMG] and fun to make!
     
  3. maplesky7

    maplesky7 Flock Mistress

    Jun 14, 2008
    N. IL.
    aww...they are so cute.


    "cold mountain water"....unreal. [​IMG]

    So are they a hard candy or like a carmel?
     
  4. bigmike&nan

    bigmike&nan Chillin' With My Peeps

    FRUGAL,

    HI !! First of all I gotta threadjack and tell you thank you for the sour dough recipe. Being from San Francisco I miss my sour dough...

    I gotta take time and search all your posts and read your recipes. I like the way you write AND use photos to help people understand what you are talking about via the photos... A man after my own heart/style.

    Best Regards,

    Michael
     
  5. Ec_Prokta

    Ec_Prokta Continuum Shift Anomaly

    Jan 14, 2009
    I LOVE maple candy!
     
  6. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Land of Lincoln
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    When making candy, can you make it as a hard candy or would it "break" apart? Something good to suck on for a good while!

    Love your posts! Keep it up!
     
  7. frugal

    frugal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 9, 2008
    NEK, Vermont
    bigmike&nan :

    FRUGAL,

    HI !! First of all I gotta threadjack and tell you thank you for the sour dough recipe. Being from San Francisco I miss my sour dough...

    I gotta take time and search all your posts and read your recipes. I like the way you write AND use photos to help people understand what you are talking about via the photos... A man after my own heart/style.

    Best Regards,

    Michael


    Thanks for the kind words Michael. Your dishes all look so good I'm sure I'd gain 60 pounds just trying them all![​IMG] Do you cook for a living or are you just a sport eater like me?


    Quote:Yes, it's a different process than I used for making soft candy but it's just as easy. I try to learn something new each sugaring season and next year I'll probably learn how to make Maple Creme and Hard Maple Candy.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Acre of Blessings

    Acre of Blessings Canning/Sewing Addict

    Apr 3, 2008
    Axton, VA
    I would so love to make some of those. My favorite candy is those Maple Nut Goodies. YUMMY!!!!! [​IMG]
     
  9. mwdh1

    mwdh1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 21, 2009
    Indiana
    Thank you Frugal for another wonderful recipe, I will have to include this one in my personal collection.
     

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