Mastitis or no? (Dr. Naylor's Indicators)

ABS9590

Songster
6 Years
Feb 18, 2016
200
265
191
15658429060307752544956933962327.jpg
Originally I though green but the longer I look the more blue it seems.
An old Nubian doe who I thought had weaned her kids started showing a large and uncomfortable looking udder more than 2 weeks after her babies were rehomed. One side is warm to the touch, but no lumps, strings, or blood in the milk. Milk looks normal in a jar, but when frozen is definitely yellow.
 

cassie

Free Ranging
13 Years
Mar 19, 2009
7,490
5,123
531
Taste the milk. If it is salty, she has mastitis. It wouldn't hurt to take a sterile sample and have it run.
 

cassie

Free Ranging
13 Years
Mar 19, 2009
7,490
5,123
531
DON'T taste the milk! If it's an infection, it doesn't belong in your mouth! Have a sample checked by your veterinarian, and get appropriate treatment soonest.
Mary
You are probably right, but I haven't died yet. If the infection was that virulent the goat would be very sick or dead. That said, a sterile sample is the best course of action .
 

cassie

Free Ranging
13 Years
Mar 19, 2009
7,490
5,123
531
Someone who's immune compromised for any reason could be in big trouble taking that advice!!!
Mary
True. But anyone who is drinking raw milk may on occasion run into salty milk. This is one of the first indications of mastitis and the goat may not be yet showing any symptoms. If the goat is showing obvious symptoms of mastitis obviously you wouldn't taste the milk.
 

cassie

Free Ranging
13 Years
Mar 19, 2009
7,490
5,123
531
View attachment 1878347 Originally I though green but the longer I look the more blue it seems.
An old Nubian doe who I thought had weaned her kids started showing a large and uncomfortable looking udder more than 2 weeks after her babies were rehomed. One side is warm to the touch, but no lumps, strings, or blood in the milk. Milk looks normal in a jar, but when frozen is definitely yellow.
I have no idea how accurate the Naylor strips are for goats. I do know that with the California Mastitis Test there are some differences. Your best bet is to go to your vet to get a sterile vial, collect a sterile sample and have a culture run. If it turns out the goat does have mastitis, the dry period is the best time to treat it. In fact if she is dry you can just get a dry cow treatment and go ahead and treat her.
 

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