Medicated but still not 100%

whoacowboy

Chirping
8 Years
Jul 6, 2011
193
1
89
Town of Clayton
I have seven chickens that were diagnosed by a fabulous woman in my town with a respiratory problem. Some went into the chicken hospital, a/k/a quarantine. We medicated for five days. It is day seven and I am still seeing some sneezing and head shaking. I am at a loss as to why this won't clear up. Any suggestions? The medicine I can't think of but it was highly recommended.
 

greenscape

In the Brooder
10 Years
Jan 25, 2009
79
4
31
Don't know what your using. I treat mine once a month with tetracycline added to the water. Withhold water from early evening until morning fill waterers with mixture of 1tbs to a 2gal of water leave it till next morning and dump it. Never have any problems.
 
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whoacowboy

Chirping
8 Years
Jul 6, 2011
193
1
89
Town of Clayton
The med is called "Respiratory & More". 7.4% Erythromycine, 11% Furaltadone, 3.3% Oxytetracycline, 1.7% Dypirone, .2% Vitamin K3.
 

silkiechicken

Staff PhD
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
13 Years
Jan 25, 2007
21,494
975
393
Everett WA/Corvallis OR
Quote:Treating before or after a problem? Giving antibiotics once a month for prevention? If that is the case, if you ever need the drug for a problem, it might not work anymore.... and you probably wouldn't have ever had a problem without treating them with anything.
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
Nov 27, 2008
26,617
10,630
766
Glen St Mary, Florida
Quote:I stand corrected about the oxine. Consider denagard though, there isnt any withdrawal nor resistance to it. The "no resistance" would be worth it IMO. Good luck.
 

greenscape

In the Brooder
10 Years
Jan 25, 2009
79
4
31
Ok silkiechicken. Good point. . With me the ones I treat like this are all penned in separate pens (pairs and trios) Bantam OEGB's. I don't treat my Layers they free range and I've never had a problem with them.
I had a rooster that I lost to upper respiratory and saved another one when I treated the first time last year.
I'll look into something to switch out with . Or maybe just stop treatment all together. Haven't had any more problems so maybe I got it cleared up .
I also spray with a weak bleach solution when I clean pens so that may be enough for now.
 

silkiechicken

Staff PhD
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
13 Years
Jan 25, 2007
21,494
975
393
Everett WA/Corvallis OR
Quote:It's not necessarily only an issue with them per se. Once they have recovered from a single treatment, it is best to leave it as is and let their natural systems take over.

Each treatment with the same drug will just increase the percentage of "bad resistant" bugs. Eventually the percentage of "bad resistant" ones get too large, you will have a problem you can't fix anymore. Small bits of bad can be combated by the natural immunity of living things AND the presence of healthy bacteria taking up resources that the bad ones need to survive.

The more concerning part though, is bacteria can exchange their immunities to drugs with each other by just contact. They carry immunity genes on plasmids, which are little bits of DNA which float around inside them. This is something good to be aware of because bacteria on a chicken who is resistant to a med you use on it, can "gift" that resistance plasmid to a bacteria on your skin, which can "gift" that to other bacteria and so on. (Horizontal gene transfer) This can make certain antibiotics not even work on you or your other pets, even if you've never taken the drug or administered it to another animal.

I avoid antibiotics unless absolutely necessary, when when in use, use a full course only once.
 

greenscape

In the Brooder
10 Years
Jan 25, 2009
79
4
31
Point well taken.The reasoning of your statement is the reason I don't take antibiotics for myself. Just never thought about it in chickens etc.
So treatment is now stopped. I guess I need to find another antibiotic for future problems Only when there is a problem.
 

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