Minkenry

R2elk

Free Ranger
Premium member
7 Years
Feb 24, 2013
12,188
38,883
1,141
Natrona County, Wyoming
Since it’s a new sport and hasn’t gained any popularity yet there are no laws against or about owning a mink. It’s not mentioned anywhere. Technically I can own a mink without breaking the law since there are no laws against it, I’d just keep it quiet.
I assume that since you are in Massachusetts that you think there are no state laws against it there. Mink are not on the list of wild animals that Massachusetts allows people to take from the wild.

https://www.mass.gov/guides/wildlife-as-pets

I believe that you have been misinformed about laws regarding wildlife. Talk to your local game warden or DNR agent. It is very likely that a permit is needed to trap in Massachusetts and definitely is illegal to take a mink from the wild and keep as a pet where you live.
 

itsasmallfarm

Crowing
Oct 27, 2016
1,830
2,664
291
canada
hey did any of you guys get your mink or see any?

was out mule deer hunting and saw a mink in a tiny creek, funny i never saw one till a year ago now i have seen maybe 5 or six of them. on different occasions.
 

Corvidgirl

Hatching
Dec 24, 2018
2
0
1
Let me first start by saying: NO COMPLAINTS/HATE SPEECHES ABOUT MINKS AND/OR WEASELS AND OTHER MUSTILEDAES. I understand that minks and other mustiledaes can do an incredible amount of damage to poultry. Us poultry keepers typically hate them. Moving on… Minkenry is a new sport/practice related to falconry. Minks are trained and tamed to hunt rats, muskrats and fish, as well as other animals and return the prey to the handler. I was inspired by Joseph Carter, he first invented minkenry a few years ago. His YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/josephdcarter my plan is to live trap and tame one. Any tips on trapping techniques? Anyone with minkenry experience?
I follow The Mink Man and love all his vids. Rats pose such a problem to chickens . I hope no one ever has to see the horrific site of a rat making off with a chick
 

NicolasMink

Hatching
Jun 11, 2019
2
0
1
No, trap was jut rebaited
Hiya, I just joined today in order to respond to this thread.

Chickenkeeper, PLEASE listen to R2elk. In most states you cannot just go out & trap & possess live wildlife. There are not many laws on the books governing *minkenry*, but there are LOTS of laws on the books in nearly all dtates, governing the possession of live wildlife.

Failure to fully research and understand your state laws could result in your future mink being seized and euthanized, in addition to wildlife violation ticket/fines.

Domestic mink are federally recognized as domestic livestock, BUT, not every state recognizes that domestic status. In my state for example, domestic mink are not recognized as separate from wild. You need the same Chapter 10 WY Game & Fish permit for possession of wild or domestic.

Please please please cross your "t"s and for your "i"s. If you dont, it could end in heartbreak and the death of your animal.

Addressing some other stuff I saw up thread:

Ferrets (U.S. ferrets) should typically not be used for hunting anything larger than mice, and certainly not muskrats. Even a big male Norway rat could seriously injure or kill a ferret. Ferrets, typical ferrets as we know them in the U.S., simply do not have the speed and strength necessary to hunt larger prey, they are not semi-aquatic and therefore definitely not suited to hunt muskrat. And, most states in the U.S. do have laws on the books that prohibit using ferrets to hunt. Aside from all that, mink are far more powerful, faster, intelligent, and larger. They are simply better suited to the task of hunting large, and especially aquatic, prey. Ferrets are better suited for rabbiting and smaller vermin control.

I saw one comment about pinning a ferret (or something of the sort?) and bopping it on the nose for biting dicipline. You do NOT want to try that with a mink. That outdated technique should not be used on ferrets either, but try that with a mink and you will permanently damage your relationship with the animal. Mink do not work that way and they are no where near as forgiving as the domestic ferret.

Chickenkeeper, I wonder if you have ever considered looking into obtaining a wildlife rehab licence? It would give you an opportunity to work with (and help) various mustelid that you cannot otherwise legally keep in captivity. You'd have to rehab and release of course, but it could present an opportunity for some interesting experiences. Not many rehab work with mustelids. I can put you in contact with some people if you like.
 
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