My birds are getting older!!

Discussion in 'Quail' started by holachicka, Jul 8, 2010.

  1. holachicka

    holachicka Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 4, 2010
    Folsom, CA
    I have 30 coturnix quail in a 7'x4' pen... I've started to notice that the girls are starting to purrr... and I'm starting to notice a few of them missing head feathers. Is this just normal behavior, or do i need to split them into different groups? I'll have three of these 7x4 pens when I'm finished, but I also have 30 butler bobwhite eggs on lockdown... any recommendations of how to spread out my birds? Or do i need to start building new pens?
     
  2. chickenwhisperer

    chickenwhisperer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 29, 2007
    Chicken Country, U S A
    How old are they now?

    As you know, I "got rid of" my extra males, and my females dont seem so rough-looking in the neck anymore.
    They still have a male to service them.

    Once you start hearing the males have calling contests at 3am, youll "get rid of" some too . . .

    Its not THAT loud, and it sounds like any old wild bird really, and I know I am just more in tune to hearing it and the fact that I know what it is, my neighbor said "it doesnt bother me but I can hear it".

    Just remember the rules of thumb . . . 1 male for 5 females, and at least 1sqft per bird
    (LOL, I dont follow these rules in any way shape or form)

    The picked necks are signs of males chasing females, or breeding, and is gonna happen if you keep the 2 sexes together.
    Smaller groups or less males should help.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2010
  3. jenjscott

    jenjscott Mosquito Beach Poultry

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    May 24, 2008
    Southeast Arkansas
    That's enough space for 30 cotunix, but what is the ratio of guys to gals? If you keep it to one male to every 4 or 5 females, your females won't get in such rough shape. Several posters have said it helps to have some cover in there, like branches or something.
     

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