My chicken coop has a sweet smell to it...what does it mean?

SummerCK

In the Brooder
7 Years
Aug 12, 2012
20
0
22
I walked into my chicken coop today and it smelled sweet. I wasn't a bad sweet but it wasn't a good one either. I would like to know if anybody has ever experienced this or knows what it is.

Thanks.
 

Red Barn Farms

~Friendly Fowl~
7 Years
Apr 12, 2012
3,158
157
228
Kentucky Heartland
Hum, wasn't a corn snake in there was there? Sweet, musky smell? I actually do not know. Have you changed anything as in bedding,, etc lately?
 
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CluckyCharms

Songster
7 Years
Sep 28, 2012
1,454
72
198
Missouri, but Montana in my dreams
My Coop
I would sift your chickens' bedding out of the way and look for molded areas along the walls, flooring and ceiling. Mold (depending on the type) can often smell quite sweet and earthy (not a good kind of sweet). Moths can create sweet scents as well as several other types of creepy-crawlies if there are enough of them. Boxelder bugs smell like a citronella candle (sweet) mixed with a pretty ripe skunk (and I don't know about everywhere else, but it's badddd for boxelder bugs here right now). Another cause could be what red barn farms already stated - corn snakes. However, it's just the male that emits the smell and you'd have to have a pretty good number of them in your coop to really notice it (or a very large adult) - depending on the size of your coop. Lots of things out there that can cause a sweetstink - I'd start looking beneath the coop bedding and around the base of the walls.
 
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SummerCK

In the Brooder
7 Years
Aug 12, 2012
20
0
22
I haven't changed the bedding lately and I use pineshavings. I checked around and didn't notice any bugs or snakes but I will look for mold. Thanks and I will update soon. Is the mold bad and if so how could I take care of it?
 

SummerCK

In the Brooder
7 Years
Aug 12, 2012
20
0
22
Ok we'll the smell is gone. I dot know what caused it but thanks guys
 

kaylee gee

Chirping
7 Years
Jul 5, 2012
159
2
88
Lehigh Acres, FL
I was actually looking online earlier, and came across this: (I was looking up wild animal poo! lol!)

http://www.discoverwildlife.com/british-wildlife/how-identify-animal-droppings

Badger

  • Faeces can be very variable – soft and even runny when they have been eating worms, or solid and firm, like a large, fat sausage, when eating wheat or fruit.
  • Where badgers are common, these are generally deposited in shallow pits, but are more generally just left on the surface. Easily recognised by sweet, musky smell.

So if you live in an area where badgers live, it may have been one!
 

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