1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

My Experience with Dry Fowl Pox

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by haejungkim, Jun 9, 2017.

  1. haejungkim

    haejungkim Out Of The Brooder

    51
    4
    41
    Feb 14, 2017
    I wanted to relay my experience with dry fowl pox because it was a bit stressful for a newby chicken owner. I didn't even know about the disease and when I saw the first small dark scab on my 5 month old, I thought it was dried blood from a peck mark. Others on this forum seemed to think so as well. However the spots started to pop up here and there and finally one by one, each chicken except one started to get the spots. I think I saw the first spot on May 20th.

    Here is what I did for the infected chicks:

    1. Swabbed the scabs with triple antibiotic ointment daily
    2. Added electrolytes to the water- don't get the ones for children because they have a lot of sugar or sugar substitutes.
    3. Added Nutri Drench to oatmeal every morning.
    4. Added grapefruit seed extract to their water.

    On a normal basis, their diet has fermented feed and ACV in their water.

    One chick Birdie had a much slower recovery. She was lethargic and wouldn't eat for a day or two. She also hid and isolated herself from her friends. When chicks don't eat, I've been told by a vet that it's urgent. When I saw that she wasn't eating, I enticed her with mealworms and hand fed her oatmeal. After two days of special attention, she was more active. She was a buddy that seemed to be by her side a lot more during this time. I also noticed that another chick was pecking at her Birdie's sores so we got some Pick-No-More and applied the stuff on Birdie. This helped a lot. It made me think that maybe she wasn't eating because she didn't want to be around the flock. She his her left side as well when hiding herself- her left side was the more hideous side. It was like she was saying: Don't look at me!!

    Well as of today the other birds look OK- just a few more scabs that need to fall off. Birdie still as a bunch of black scabs left but her mood and activity level is back to normal. I'm very relieved to see this disease come and go. I guess I just wanted to write this so that if this happens in your flock, you don't totally freak out. I've included some photos of the different stages of the disease. 2017-06-01 15.15.25.jpg 2017-05-25 12.24.12.jpg 2017-05-31 08.20.11.jpg 2017-05-29 17.16.07.jpg
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Sits With Chickens Premium Member

    15,914
    3,509
    436
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    I've dealt with the dry pox, I do nothing as it runs it's course in about 6 weeks. It gets worse before it get better. It's transmitted by mosquitoes, and by direct contact. Messing with the scabs can help spread it I have read.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by