need help putting together a guide for preparing for new flock.

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by DianaMallory, Mar 19, 2015.

  1. DianaMallory

    DianaMallory Chillin' With My Peeps

    697
    61
    156
    Jul 20, 2012
    Lancaster Ohio
    I have had so many ask me about raising chickens and the last time I got ask I decide to come up with a few chick points on getting started. Points on things before like needs and convenience needs. 101 things you need to know before you get chicks.
    Like making or having a large enough brooder space ready and waiting. Having your coop and run done way before hand. and so on. Tell me what your first word of advise would be to someone who is thinking about it and starting to ask questions about it.
     
  2. jk47

    jk47 Chillin' With My Peeps

    287
    13
    108
    Apr 17, 2013
    CA
    Make sure to buy a hanging feeder and use a 20% feed. It saves alot of time instead of buying trough style chick feeders
    Have your brooder clean and disinfect before each use
    Buy everything in advance before you order your chicks
     
  3. DianaMallory

    DianaMallory Chillin' With My Peeps

    697
    61
    156
    Jul 20, 2012
    Lancaster Ohio
    Good advise! I was thinking about they should ask themselves if they have a life style that they can handle chickens. You see so many fall in love with the idea of the little fluffy things taking them home not prepared and getting rid of them because they didn't realize they would grow that fast and the work involved.
     
  4. jk47

    jk47 Chillin' With My Peeps

    287
    13
    108
    Apr 17, 2013
    CA
    I don't get the to much work part
    If you plan ahead and don't over buy
    I have 25 hens and I don't do a whole lot of work. Feeders last three days waterers last 1week and I clean the coop once a month
    Other then my daily health walk through I only spend about an 1hr a day with them and there perfectly fine with that
     
  5. DianaMallory

    DianaMallory Chillin' With My Peeps

    697
    61
    156
    Jul 20, 2012
    Lancaster Ohio
    I clean my poo boards off daily, check feeders and water daily let them in and out of the coop morning and night. Yes I lock mine down at night due to predators. I only have to change my bedding every 3-4 months. And that is a hard job. Yes there is a lot of work that goes into taking care of any pet/animal. Take someone who likes to go a lot, I would suggest they think it through before taking on chickens. They do have to be taken care of daily. Like today, I have no idea how they did it but I was late letting them out of the coop and they had somehow got one side of their feeder pulled down and dumped their water that I just filled yesterday. I also collect my eggs daily. So yes there is a lot of work involved. Sure I could let the poo boards go but I find if I clean it daily the sweet PDZ. last longer. And it is just easier for me.
     
  6. SammileeChickie

    SammileeChickie Chillin' With My Peeps

    275
    13
    88
    Mar 7, 2015
    Southern California
    I'm guessing this is if you have multiple chicks.? :( I only have two, they live inside with us in my room in my old guinea pigs cage. I change their water 3-4 times a day to make sure it's not so poopy and I only do the food morning and night :) I also talk and play with them every chance I get because I love having a strong bond with my animals. Their family to me not pets [​IMG]
    I would say, for someone who has allergies to use puppy pee pads because you won't have dust and shavings flying everywhere
     
  7. DianaMallory

    DianaMallory Chillin' With My Peeps

    697
    61
    156
    Jul 20, 2012
    Lancaster Ohio
    This is for someone who wants chickens for egg production not FOO FOO chicks! My flock of 11 which was suppose to be 12 but one was a roo that turned aggressive so I culled him I don't consider as pets. I brooded them in the house but as soon as they were big enough they went to their own space outside! Were I might add working chickens belong! But you do have a good point. Which is research. Know what you want out of your birds. Are you getting them for egg production, for meat or ornamental reasons. Well so far I have, Check your life style and make sure you have time for them. Then decide what you expect out of them. Research the breeds to find which one suites what you want. Check your area to make sure you are allowed to have them in your zone. Figure out how many you want. Research how much brooder space, coop space, and run space. I think I will suggest either going on line and checking out operating coops or visit someone you know already has one. And I suggest joining BYC!

    Anyone else have anything to add to this check list. This is a check list for things you should know before getting Chickens.
     
  8. ChicKat

    ChicKat Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

    Hi Diana,
    [​IMG]

    you covered a lot of what people should do and be aware of. You and the other posters--- Research - definitely. Know what you want your chickens for... producing eggs, making the yard pretty and keeping bugs down, taking to shows, 4H projects -- then find the breed that will suit that purpose the best.

    It is great to be fully prepared...and be aware of what predators could be a threat to your flock and what you can do to protect the chickens from them. Talk to - and try to find others who will be there when you have questions. - Have a sturdy box - or a pet carrier someplace so you can isolate one of your chickens if you should ever have the need to do it. If the breed that you select has a breed club -- consider joining it -- because you will also find help, answers and resources there.

    [​IMG]

    Some folks do what chickens for house pets! -- even if that seems foo foo -- and why not? chickens are great! ;o)
     
  9. DianaMallory

    DianaMallory Chillin' With My Peeps

    697
    61
    156
    Jul 20, 2012
    Lancaster Ohio
    Oh good one on predators. Having had 2 bad experiences in the past BC, before computers!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by