Need Help W/ Tractor Demensions

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Corey NC, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. Corey NC

    Corey NC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2007
    North Carolina
    I am trying to plan out a tractor I want to build. It will hold around 5-8 seramas and will be moved every couple days. They would mainly be in run and only go into the "coop area" to roost at night and to lay. I am terrible of figuring out deminsions in my head so can someone help me figure out if this is a good plan. A step by stepguide would be helpful, lol.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2008
  2. fowltemptress

    fowltemptress Frugal Fan Club President

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    Jan 20, 2008
    It seems skinny to me, I'd widen it to 3 or 4 feet. Most of ours are about 8 or 10 feet by four feet, and about five feet tall. With two feet your chickens don't have much manueverability, but then none of mine are as small as seramas. good luck!
     
  3. twigg

    twigg Cooped up

    Mar 2, 2008
    Tulsa
    2 x 2 at the top means not much headroom ... the sides slope.

    3 foot wide might be better ... they always end up bigger than you intended, it's a rule of coop-building [​IMG]

    8 medium sized birds want around 64 inches of root space.
     
  4. Corey NC

    Corey NC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2007
    North Carolina
    Would a I be able to move it if it was bigger?
     
  5. Corey NC

    Corey NC Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 28, 2007
    North Carolina
    Oh and to give you an idea of their size my 11 week old seramas are smaller than my 6 week old buff orps.
     
  6. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    mine is 4x7 and I can move it just fine, if that helps you any.

    the wider design not only gives the chickens a lot more useable room in the shelter, it also makes the whole tractor more stable (vs wind or dogs) and stronger (less tendency to twist and rack and pull the joints apart).


    Pat
     

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