Neuturing roo

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by smokeyodie97, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. smokeyodie97

    smokeyodie97 Chillin' With My Peeps

    222
    0
    109
    Jun 22, 2010
    MISSISSIPPI
    Has anybody ever tried this. And if. You do will they still crow.
     
  2. scratch'n'peck

    scratch'n'peck Overrun With Chickens

    5,916
    546
    341
    Oct 31, 2008
    West Michigan
    My Coop
    You could look up caponization. I suppose they would crow less.

    I am lucky enough to not live too near the neighbors and I like my roosters crows, but I know it is a problem for a lot of folks.
     
  3. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

    10,684
    97
    321
    May 13, 2008
    The process is called Caponizing, a procedure where a small incision is made and the tesicals are removed. I Don't know if they still crow after this, but my guess is they still will crow, he is still a rooster after all ( just with a higher pitched crow LOL ) .
     
  4. smokeyodie97

    smokeyodie97 Chillin' With My Peeps

    222
    0
    109
    Jun 22, 2010
    MISSISSIPPI
    scratch'n'peck :

    You could look up caponization. I suppose they would crow less.

    I am lucky enough to not live too near the neighbors and I like my roosters crows, but I know it is a problem for a lot of folks.

    I LOVE to hear them crow.​
     
  5. ranchhand

    ranchhand Rest in Peace 1956-2011

    13,295
    18
    291
    Aug 25, 2008
    SC
    What are you trying to achieve?

    Caponizing a rooster isn't the easiest of processes, and if you're just got too many roosters around it's easier to just butcher them for food. Or rehome them.
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

    31,452
    3,536
    538
    Jun 18, 2010
    Southern Oregon
    check out the meat bird threads, tiff-n-kidz and other folks have caponized and tell of the experience.
     
  7. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

    4,392
    112
    243
    Feb 25, 2011
    Boise
    Caponizing is an option, but probably not the best one.

    The first problem is that you probably don't have any vets near you that are practised in the proceedure. It went out of style a long time ago because of danger to the bird, and expense to perform the proceedure.

    The second problem is that chicken testacles are deeply buried inside the body. It's not like a dog where you just do a quick cut and it's problem solved. This is open cavity surgery we're talking about, and it has a high mortality rate since most people don't bother to give their birds antibiotics afterwards.

    I've seen several people post here about experimenting at home with caponizing, with no formal training in veterinary or medical science. I find that deeply DEEPLY horrific. BUT, I realize that it's individual choice. ( I am just very empathic, and get ill at the thought of someone doing untrained rooting around in my guts just because they were curious and thought of me as a lesser organism).

    I'd rather see a bird processed for stew than see them be someone's 'experiment' for gee wiz reasons. It's pretty much animal cruelty to do untrained deep cavity cutting on an animal without any anesthesia.

    I have to add that a rooster going under a professionally trained knife in a medical environment is a whole other kettle of fish.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by