New to turkeys, sick baby, please help!

georgieboy11

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Jan 12, 2018
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I just went to big R (My local tractor store) And picked up 3 chicken chicks and one baby turkey (I'm so new to this I don't even know what to call them.) The baby turkey is a broad breasted white and he seemed good when I picked him out but looking at him closer the top of his beak was bleeding like it was pecked at, and just now when I put him in the brooder with the rest of my chicks he just immediately lay down and went to sleep, my other chicks started pecking at him and he didn't do anything he just laid there and let them peck him. I shooed them off and watched them for a few minutes and they left him alone so I left the room to do something else and he started chirping really loud and so I went and got him and held him and sat him on the ground and he will barely stand up. I have him in my sweatshirt now. Also, the chicks I had him in with were vaccinated for Marek's disease and as far as I know he is not, is that bad? Also, any other turkey tips would be great!
 

oldhenlikesdogs

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You shouldn't keep a single turkey. They need other turkeys. If raised with chickens they will bond with them. I've had turkeys raised with chickens kill them.

Turkeys need a warmer brooder, a higher protein ration and more attention from you to make sure it's eating and drinking. Turkey poults are loud when unhappy and can fail quickly in those first few weeks.

Broad breasted varieties won't be long lived and are prone to leg and heart problems, so they are best for butchering.
 

georgieboy11

Songster
Jan 12, 2018
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Indiana
You shouldn't keep a single turkey. They need other turkeys. If raised with chickens they will bond with them. I've had turkeys raised with chickens kill them.

Turkeys need a warmer brooder, a higher protein ration and more attention from you to make sure it's eating and drinking. Turkey poults are loud when unhappy and can fail quickly in those first few weeks.

Broad breasted varieties won't be long lived and are prone to leg and heart problems, so they are best for butchering.

Okay I will get another poult tomorrow if I can, how warm should the brooder be for them? I had no idea the broad breasted were for butchering, I just got him for a pet and the little things so sweet. I’ll give him a good life as long as I can. Do you have any tips for taking care of him?
 

oldhenlikesdogs

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Okay I will get another poult tomorrow if I can, how warm should the brooder be for them? I had no idea the broad breasted were for butchering, I just got him for a pet and the little things so sweet. I’ll give him a good life as long as I can. Do you have any tips for taking care of him?
You will have to guess at his age. I generally brood turkey poults 5 degrees warmer that first week than I do chicks. Use it's behavior to tell if it's warm enough. Poults need to be taught to eat and drink, so hopefully your chicks are showing him. Watch to make sure it is. Otherwise I tap my finger and peep to show poults the food, and water, most figure it out after a few days.

You can put some brown sugar in the water for quick energy, I use 1 teaspoon per quart the first few days, otherwise electrolyte solution will work.

Poults can be a bit clumsy their first week too. You may need to separate it from the chicks especially if it's getting pecked. You don't need to worry about Mareks. Turkeys can carry the disease but they don't get sick from it.

I'm sure others will be along with more tips.
 

georgieboy11

Songster
Jan 12, 2018
128
177
157
Indiana
You will have to guess at his age. I generally brood turkey poults 5 degrees warmer that first week than I do chicks. Use it's behavior to tell if it's warm enough. Poults need to be taught to eat and drink, so hopefully your chicks are showing him. Watch to make sure it is. Otherwise I tap my finger and peep to show poults the food, and water, most figure it out after a few days.

You can put some brown sugar in the water for quick energy, I use 1 teaspoon per quart the first few days, otherwise electrolyte solution will work.

Poults can be a bit clumsy their first week too. You may need to separate it from the chicks especially if it's getting pecked. You don't need to worry about Mareks. Turkeys can carry the disease but they don't get sick from it.

I'm sure others will be along with more tips.

Thank you so much for the tips, that helped a lot! He is doing a lot better this morning. He is running around and eating and drinking. He cried a lot last night but I have the brooder right next to my bed so I watched all night to make sure the chicks weren't picking on him and they were all getting along okay, he just wanted back in my sweatshirt. :lol: I had to play some turkey noises I found on youtube for him all night and then he calmed down. I can't believe how sweet he is, if I open up the door on my brooder and sit next to it he runs out and jumps in my lap. The chicks that are in with him I hatched out in the incubator and have been with them since day one and they all hate me, I've had this little guy for a day and he trusts me!
 

oldhenlikesdogs

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I'm glad it's doing better after some rest.

Turkey poults are definitely different than chicks. They are super friendly from the start. Chicks hatch and work off of instinct, poults hatch ready to learn so they are more interactive, and can be taught.

Mine will come when called and are curious about everything. Hopefully you still get it a turkey friend, it will remain friendly, and than you will have 2, and won't feel bad when you can't be with it.
 

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