Not a Lavender Orpington??

BBSnavely

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Dec 8, 2012
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I was told both white birds were Lavender Orpingtons. Looking at other pics of adult birds, it seems that is not correct. Alot of Brown on the rooster, tons of grey and gold on the hen.

Could they be another type of Orpington? What do you think?

IMG_20200605_090419.jpg
IMG_20200605_090221.jpg
 

TheMother

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May 17, 2020
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Washington
I was told both white birds were Lavender Orpingtons. Looking at other pics of adult birds, it seems that is not correct. Alot of Brown on the rooster, tons of grey and gold on the hen.

Could they be another type of Orpington? What do you think?

View attachment 2182767 View attachment 2182772
Those don't look like Lavender orpingtons. It kind of looks like a Favorelle...
 

Doc7

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May 12, 2018
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Central Virginia
Look like mutt chickens to me (mixed breeds) probably of parentage designed to include a green/blue egg gene (would be called an Easter Egger, which is not a breed, but means “mixed breed with blue egg gene”, if they have it).

meyer is even coming out this year with “green queen” which... is a “sub breed” of the non-breed “Easter egger”. Sigh.

dont get me wrong - my Meyer EE was my second favorite chicken of all time. just think it’s funny to confuse the matter further. Green Queen is just a particular flock of mixed chickens and the name will help them sell more - maybe someone will buy one “EE” and one “Green Queen” when they might have only bought one EE previously.
 

Doc7

Songster
May 12, 2018
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Those are "Easter Eggers"
They look like Easter Eggers or mixed breeds to me.

maybe you can help me clear up the genetics before I spread a bunch of misinformation on the forum.

my knowledge is that an EE is a mixed breed chicken with a blue egg gene.

my *belief* (opposed to knowledge) is that this means it is not truly possible to ID one based on visual appearance and here is the reason i think that. But maybe there are genes tied to one another that I don’t understand and you can clear up.

let’s say you have 2 “Easter Eggers” with one blue egg gene each. (So they Would each give some shade of green to blue egg if hens, but one is a Roo one is a Hen). They mate. Wouldn’t 25% of the fertilized eggs have 2 blue egg genes, 50% of them would have 1 blue egg gene, and 25% zero?

therefore, a batch of 10 chicks from that hen, all siblings with the same father and mother, around 75% would be Easter Eggers and 25% would not be (no blue egg gene). If this is all true, it means to me I can’t look at those 10 chicks and say which ones are EEs and which are just plain ol mutts. I welcome any correction so I understand better.
 

TheOddOneOut

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TheDawg

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maybe you can help me clear up the genetics before I spread a bunch of misinformation on the forum.

my knowledge is that an EE is a mixed breed chicken with a blue egg gene.

my *belief* (opposed to knowledge) is that this means it is not truly possible to ID one based on visual appearance and here is the reason i think that. But maybe there are genes tied to one another that I don’t understand and you can clear up.

let’s say you have 2 “Easter Eggers” with one blue egg gene each. (So they Would each give some shade of green to blue egg if hens, but one is a Roo one is a Hen). They mate. Wouldn’t 25% of the fertilized eggs have 2 blue egg genes, 50% of them would have 1 blue egg gene, and 25% zero?

therefore, a batch of 10 chicks from that hen, all siblings with the same father and mother, around 75% would be Easter Eggers and 25% would not be (no blue egg gene). If this is all true, it means to me I can’t look at those 10 chicks and say which ones are EEs and which are just plain ol mutts. I welcome any correction so I understand better.
Easter Eggers can lay any color egg, not just blue. So technically all the birds in your example would be Easter Eggers. And there are some traits that are common to them and that a lot of Easter Eggers will have, like the green/slate colored legs, pea combs, and beards/muffs, which these birds have. Not every Easter Egger will have them of course, it depends on the mix, but a lot of the hatchery ones will. Also even though EEs are technically mixes too, in my example I guess I was more meaning they could be a mix of a bunch of different breeds, like a barnyard mix. Hopefully this helps a bit.
 

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