NPIP certification

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by mustangsaguaro, Mar 6, 2012.

  1. mustangsaguaro

    mustangsaguaro Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So I am thinking about getting NPIP certified. But I am wondering in the long run is it really worth it. I know the program is for testing birds to make sure they don't have AI or Pullorum/Typhoid. I live in Ca. and I think for the state of Ca. to get the cert. and remain certified there is the yearly testing which at this point is free. But then to remain certified it is $50 twice a year. So $100 for the year. I am currently trying to breed Lavender Ameraucana's as well as planning on getting into the paint silkies. I have a small flock right now of 17 birds. Will probably increase it to no more than 30 birds. Is it worth everything you have to go thru to get certified or should I not worry about certification.

    If you can give me your pros/cons about this I'd greatly appreciate it.

    THanks
     
  2. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Do you plan to ship eggs or live birds across state lines? Or participate in poultry shows?
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2012
  3. mustangsaguaro

    mustangsaguaro Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I already have shipped eggs across state lines. Will not ship live birds though. Don't want to hassle w/ live birds being shipped. Honestly how forceful is the USPS about that? When I shipped the eggs I told the postal service person there were eggs in there. They didn't ask to see any NPIP certification or anything. There are maybe 2 shows a year I plan to attend in my area. Neither of the shows require birds to be tested. I found out about that late last year.
     
  4. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    The program has pretty much wiped out pullorum/typhoid. Not participating & selling hatching eggs or birds to others, not to mention participating in shows strikes me as pretty irresponsible.
     
  5. mustangsaguaro

    mustangsaguaro Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sure there are plenty of others that ship eggs that are not NPIP certified. I know if you are NPIP certified you agree to only buy eggs and other birds from others that are NPIP certified. Don't want to start any arguments here. Just wanted to know if it was worth it year after year to be certified.
     
  6. NYREDS

    NYREDS Overrun With Chickens

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    And I would say they too are being irresponsible.
     
  7. carladababe

    carladababe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Two questions please. What color eggs do Lavender Ameraucana's lay? How do you ship your eggs? I've always wanted to share my eggs with family in another state. Do they have to be certified to ship if it's not for commercial purposes?[​IMG]
     
  8. madamwlf

    madamwlf Nevermore Acres

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    I got tested because I am going to ship eggs and possibly birds. I wish to do the right thing and not give the state or federal government a reason to look at me. Besides there are many who are tested and will only buy eggs from others who are NPIP certified. So if you have nice breeds, it just might be worth it.
     
  9. EweSheep

    EweSheep Flock Mistress

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    Being NPIP guarantee that your flock is free from typhoid and pullorum free at the time of testing. These diseases can come in at any time after testing so it is not always 100% fool proof.

    I buy all my birds from NPIP sources and have sold hatching eggs and birds without any problems within state and out of state. Had one tester done on all of my birds, all tested negative for those two diseases.

    People now are testing flocks for MP/MG free. Even roughly 80 percent of the birds will have it.

    So how that I am not being responsible? I am being responsible on my end, ensuring my flock are healthy, free from T and P and bottom line, it is buyer's beware. We all take risks more than others while others will not. It is not any different than bringing your birds from the shows or never show them, somehow, somewhere it will happen and NPIP is false security. And I will not have the government in the livestock division telling me what I can raise and not raise.

    Ask many breeders about NPIP status, they will do everything they can to keep the diseases out of their flock but once they leave their flock, there is absolutely nothing they can do about it.

    Would I go NPIP? No.

    Does USPS check for NPIP status? No, it is not their responsibility to make sure your birds have been tested. Had two postal inspectors saying no, they do not check NPIP status, nor have the man power to make sure it is updated but it is the primary responsibility of both parties of seller and buyer to determine the health of the birds. Sure I have sent two EE;s to NY about seven years ago and never had any issues, as well as the chicks and one other started birds without the NPIP papers. I've had two breeders that has NPIP and they never included papers with it. Neither does Ideal Hatchery either.

    It is the most responsible thing for us breeders to maintain the health and buy from reliable sources for our flock. Maybe we should work on getting our flock MG/MS/LLV negative as well as Avian Flu negative. A simple bloodwork from your own vet can get it done without the NPIP papers if you want to take that route. I've done it and was pleased with our avian vet and be able to work closely with him regarding to all chicken diseases and the chances and risks involved. I can sell a bird if the seller wants bloodwork done on it (at their cost) and it will be done.

    Common sense prevails. You can practice your own bio security without the NPIP papers.
     
  10. greenbottle27

    greenbottle27 Out Of The Brooder

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    I have been on the fence about purchasing a chick from a particular farm. They are NPIP. And although I don't really have a full understanding of what NPIP technically means, it BOTHERS me. If an establishment is not required to be NPIP certified, then so be it. But, if it is and they are breaking a law (shipping/attending venues/breeding) then I personally would not support that said establishment.

    The farm I am looking at advertises, appears clean and has great references.THe owners are appears to be upfront, honest and very down to earth. However, they are not NPIP. But, if I can practice my own bio security - that is FANtastic. I never thought of having my vet do blood work.

    Thanks to all who posted here on this thread. I am a newbie here and am researching and learning. The letters NPIP are sorta daunting. However this statement sums it up .....

    Common sense prevails. You can practice your own bio security without the NPIP papers.

    Tomorrow I can go support local business knowing I can biosecure my own flock. A win-win for all of us.

    Now, if there is a flip side to my thought process, please let me know. Like I said, I am learning.
     

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