Odd Rooster Behavior?

FOOD SOURCE

In the Brooder
Aug 6, 2016
33
0
32
About a year and a half ago I ordered 25 chicks from Cackle Hatchery, 23 hens and 3 Rhode Island Red roosters. A few months after we had some predator come in and kill 7 of my beloved birds that included 2 of my roosters. Ever since that event my one rooster has been very aggressive. He attacks whenever he gets the chance. He used to be so nice but now he's a ... ( well the nice way of saying it) a JERK!
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He's lucky he isn't on the dinner table right now....
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My questions is why has he turned so aggressive?
 

sourland

Broody Magician
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
May 3, 2009
119,000
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New Jersey
It may be that his protective instincts were pushed into high gear because of the attack. It may also be that the deceased roosters subordinated his personality, and now that they are gone his 'true' personality is being expressed. Regardless of the cause it is unlikely that he will revert back to his calm nature.
 

carlf

Chirping
Jul 2, 2016
586
92
83
Mobile, AL
He's now king of the roost, thats why. And he sees you as just another beta rooster.
Put him in his place.
Dont act afraid of him, that just reinforces his dominance. Dont ever let him sit on you, ever.
Every time he comes after you, pick him up and carry him around until he calms down.
Carry a stick and give him a tap on the back every time he comes near you.
Dont turn your back on him.
if he gets in your way, walk straight at him & push him aside if you need too.

Sooner or later he will get the fact that his is to the Alpha. You also need to make sure he sees ALL people, including small children, as being above him in the pecking order.
If not, chicken soup.

There are some great threads on this. Do a search
 

FOOD SOURCE

In the Brooder
Aug 6, 2016
33
0
32
Thanks you for the advice! I have use an old mop stick to keep our distance, but lately he's starting to get bolder
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Outpost JWB

Songster
5 Years
Mar 31, 2014
3,467
435
246
Ohio
A practice that has worked successfully for me is putting him in "time out". I had a rooster attack me twice. I put him in a dog crate for a couple weeks. When I let him out, his attitude had adjusted for the better. He had food and water in there, but was very angry that he was not with the flock.

I agree with both the previous posters. The attack happened so long ago, I would be inclined to believe he has a place in freezer camp......as his attitude is unlikely to change.

Sometimes it is a matter of getting to know rooster behavior. They will try to put you lower in the pecking order. I am very careful around my flock leader rooster. I am not afraid of him in the least. He will not attack me, but there are instances that roosters may not understand what is going on. (Creatures of habit.) Events that may trigger aggressive behavior are changing feed times, adding, removing chickens, rearranging the coop, predator attacks, or even the presence of nearby predators. These type changes can be misconstrued by the flock leader.
 
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