Older flock and younger female

KirbyH

Chirping
Jan 22, 2019
83
98
86
Rougemont, NC
I have five 5 1/2 month old Guineas. Four of these birds persecuted one female so I separated her out into a coop of her own. There is a flock of adult birds that resides part time at my place and part time at a neighbors. They come several times a day and collect around her coop. When I release her they follow her around her circuit of the front yard. Unlike how they react to her brothers and sisters, the adults seem attentive and only occasionally mildly aggressive. Has anyone seen this behavior?

I am unable to upload the images I have of this.
 
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Friendly_Lurker

Crowing
Jan 27, 2020
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Kansas
My guineas are always aggressive to everyone and everything. If it's only the one female that's having a problem, you may need to relocate her.
 

KirbyH

Chirping
Jan 22, 2019
83
98
86
Rougemont, NC
My guineas are always aggressive to everyone and everything. If it's only the one female that's having a problem, you may need to relocate her.
It is not the aggression of her brothers and sisters that I am interested in, it is the strange lack of aggression from the members of the communal flock—that they follow her around the yard in a kind of solicitous fashion. They have had time to get acquainted through the wire of her run is all I can think of.
 

Mixed flock enthusiast

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
May 21, 2018
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Stillwater, OK
It is not the aggression of her brothers and sisters that I am interested in, it is the strange lack of aggression from the members of the communal flock—that they follow her around the yard in a kind of solicitous fashion. They have had time to get acquainted through the wire of her run is all I can think of.
Interesting! Maybe the older flock wants to add a girl?
 

Sydney65

Songster
Aug 2, 2019
563
1,306
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Indiana
It is not the aggression of her brothers and sisters that I am interested in, it is the strange lack of aggression from the members of the communal flock—that they follow her around the yard in a kind of solicitous fashion. They have had time to get acquainted through the wire of her run is all I can think of.
It's my guess that they've claimed her as well. How donthey act toward the others?
 

KirbyH

Chirping
Jan 22, 2019
83
98
86
Rougemont, NC
It's my guess that they've claimed her as well. How donthey act toward the others?
They are hostile towards the others. Yesterday one of the males from the communal adult flock sat for an hour by her coop and when I noticed his determination, I let her out. They moseyed around a bit and then quietly went into her coop (which is small) together and shared her food with no evidence of any aggression. I’m trying to decide whether to simply release her to the adult flock. If I knew she would roost with them at night, I’d do it.
 

Mixed flock enthusiast

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
May 21, 2018
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Stillwater, OK
They are hostile towards the others. Yesterday one of the males from the communal adult flock sat for an hour by her coop and when I noticed his determination, I let her out. They moseyed around a bit and then quietly went into her coop (which is small) together and shared her food with no evidence of any aggression. I’m trying to decide whether to simply release her to the adult flock. If I knew she would roost with them at night, I’d do it.
Sounds like that’s the flock she’s picking for herself... It is likely she will stick with them at night if she’s accepted by them. If they are all roosting outdoor though, then losses to predators are likely.
 

Mixed flock enthusiast

Free Ranging
Premium Feather Member
May 21, 2018
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Stillwater, OK
That wld be my concern. I'm leary to even have mine out today bc we had an unexpected this a.m. - and I said it was boring here! Definitely not normal.
View attachment 2437926
Geez! Is that a bald eagle??? Yeah I’d keep them in too! I’m amazed at how well mine can differentiate the different birds. They are a little wary and antagonistic of crows, which we like because they mob the hawks and chase them off. The guineas are also a little wary of our red shouldered hawks, which nest here and have not taken any of our birds. They do take snakes regularly, and we have those in excess. They ignore the vultures altogether. But they freak out at the red tailed hawks, which have taken one of our ducks. I hope your bald eagle moves on soon!
 

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