Older Golden Comets

Iamahz57

In the Brooder
Sep 5, 2018
8
4
21
I got 6 Golden Comets 2 years ago and they laid eggs faithfully until 6 months after getting them. They only laid eggs periodically after, I got new comets last year. Now the older hens are dying. They eat and drink water, they just keep get hunched up and stand around or the just lay down in different places. They seem like they are happy and want to hang with other chickens. A couple of chickens did this off and on for a month or so. Then we find them dying. 1 only did this for a day and then died. It's only the older hens. I think they are around 4-5 years old. I clean the coop every day and make sure water is clean and changed often. They get ACV and probiotics in the water, plus plain water. It did get really hot for a month though. These are my first chickens ever. I still get and egg from them about 1- 2 x a month. Is this just their old age???
 

cavemanrich

Addict
Premium Feather Member
7 Years
Apr 6, 2014
17,654
61,549
1,317
Melrose Park Illinois
It is indeed that they are dying of old age. These sexlink hens are excellent egg producers. They produce, and burn out. 4 to 5 years is actually on the higher lifespan. Many sexlinks go 3 to 4.
If you want longer living chickens, then opt for Heritage breeds. They tend to live +- 10 years or so.
I had an Easter Egger that lived 11 years, and a Silver Sebright, that lived 13. Many of my chickens live 8 to 10 years, unless encounter a predator:hit. I only keep chickens as pets, and do not eat them.
WISHING YOU BEST,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, :highfive:
 

Folly's place

Enabler
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
23,558
39,555
1,106
southern Michigan
Welcome! Nearly nobody selects breeding stock for longevity, and it shows!
The very high egg producing breed hens are very prone to having reproductive disorders, often earlier than other types of hens, and many many hens are dying by age three!
My oldest hens have been ten; two very small Jersey Giants, and a couple of Belgian d'Uccles.
I understand that some game breed hens can live well into their teens; Asils, Cubalyas, and Shamos. They are also great broodies, and lay few eggs per year, and generally aren't recommended as first chickens.
Enjoy your birds while you have them, and be ready to act to prevent unnecessary suffering too.
Consider getting a few chicks every year or two, so you have pullets moving into the flock as older birds move on.
Mary
 

Iamahz57

In the Brooder
Sep 5, 2018
8
4
21
Welcome! Nearly nobody selects breeding stock for longevity, and it shows!
The very high egg producing breed hens are very prone to having reproductive disorders, often earlier than other types of hens, and many many hens are dying by age three!
My oldest hens have been ten; two very small Jersey Giants, and a couple of Belgian d'Uccles.
I understand that some game breed hens can live well into their teens; Asils, Cubalyas, and Shamos. They are also great broodies, and lay few eggs per year, and generally aren't recommended as first chickens.
Enjoy your birds while you have them, and be ready to act to prevent unnecessary suffering too.
Consider getting a few chicks every year or two, so you have pullets moving into the flock as older birds move on.
It is indeed that they are dying of old age. These sexlink hens are excellent egg producers. They produce, and burn out. 4 to 5 years is actually on the higher lifespan. Many sexlinks go 3 to 4.
If you want longer living chickens, then opt for Heritage breeds. They tend to live +- 10 years or so.
I had an Easter Egger that lived 11 years, and a Silver Sebright, that lived 13. Many of my chickens live 8 to 10 years, unless encounter a predator:hit. I only keep chickens as pets, and do not eat them.
WISHING YOU BEST,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, :highfive:[/Q
y[/QUOT
 

Iamahz57

In the Brooder
Sep 5, 2018
8
4
21
We keep them as pets too. I started checking out other breeds, when ours started dying. I was hoping thare was something we could do. Thank you for your replies.
 

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