Once a chicken killer, always a chicken killer?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by moenmitz, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. moenmitz

    moenmitz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2008
    I keep seeing posts in support of the above sentiment, and it saddens me. I know, it is certainly very difficult to stop SOME dogs from killing chickens, but it is NOT impossible. In the hopes that maybe one person might give rehabilitation a try before they SSS, I post this picute, taken this afternoon, of our Tim-a reformed cat/ chicken killer. Tim is a husky/ malamute/ wolf mix- all notorious for their very strong prey drive. If HE can be convinced to stop, I think MOST other dogs could too.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Bex

    Bex Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 12, 2008
    Virginia
    As a huge Dog lover (I share my heart/home with 7!) I must say that is a BEAUTIFUL dog you have. Good on you for giving him a chance and letting him show that he can be taught to not kill your pets. [​IMG]
     
  3. moenmitz

    moenmitz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2008
    Thank you! it is not really his best picture- he is a bit grubby from playing in the rain. Wow, SEVEN dogs! Big or little? Either way, that is a lot of dogs! Must be a happy place I bet! [​IMG] He lives in total harmony with all of them now- the cats eat right our of his dish, the chickens treat him like furniture. I think the biggest thing is that dogs love to please their people- we let him know that we were very UN-pleased with the killing, and made a huge deal over his "playing nice" He is smart, and got the idea very quickly. I know there are some dogs that really CAN'T be stopped...but I would be willing to bet that a lot of them could be.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2008
  4. Birch Run Farm

    Birch Run Farm Biddy up!

    Sep 5, 2008
    VERMONT
    Excellent job in training! Yes, they can be trained as well as cats as long as a person TAKES THE TIME to do so. It's not an overnight thing, it is all about repetition and praise but also disciplin when needed.

    Nice looking dog, BTW.
     
  5. moenmitz

    moenmitz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 15, 2008
    Thank you!

    [​IMG]

    This is a much better picture though!
     
  6. AngieChick

    AngieChick Poultry Elitist

    What a stunningly beautiful animal. Good for you for taking the time and energy to train him not to kill.
     
  7. panner123

    panner123 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 15, 2007
    Garden Valley, ca
    Not all dog owners are as responsible
    as you. I am also the owner of both cats and dogs that live together with chickens and whatever other critters the grandkids may been here. It is never the dogs fault, but they are the ones that pay the price. I right now am in a legal battle with a gentleman (I am kind using that term). His dogs have killed a number of animals in the area and bitten three people. They have been in the pound more times than any should be. We where having a bar-n-que and the dogs showed up. They went to doggie heaven just before they reached one of the children. My only regret was having to shoot them and not their owner. Had he been more responsible they would not have been as mean as they were.
    He never cared enough about them to keep them locked up or fenced in.
    My fixed male cat is the best chick guard around. He will lay right on top of the brooder and will not let anyone near it other than me. The younger cat will watch the chicks look at themsevles in a mirrow without ever getting up. More of a what are you looking at stupid. And my ole dog will rush down the hill ever time the chickens make a fuss. The poor ole roo can't even mate without her running out the run barjing like all get out. There is a time when an animal must be stopped. Around here that is anytime something or someone goes after a person or a critter. I will pay the price after it is over if need be. So far that hasn't happened.
     
  8. rizq

    rizq Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 9, 2008
    Tennessee
    I agree that it is the owner's fault. Some dogs can't be taught not to kill animals or bite people, but most can. In either case, it is the owner's responsibility to contain their dog ON THEIR OWN PROPERTY for the safety of the dog and the neighbors, human or animal. People who's animals repeatedly create a nuisance make me so mad. Once I can forgive, things happen, but there is no excuse for dogs being loose repeatedly.

    I had a couple of springers get in and kill and maim several expensive show rabbits (never mind that they were also my pets and I loved every one of them). I had seen his dogs loose several times before this incident. My animals were properly caged on my property, his were not. We chased the dogs off with a pitchfork, no harm to the dogs. Sent the owner a bill. He was keeping them in "kennel" made from hog panels and said he knew they could get out. He paid the several hundred dollar bill (actually his homeowner's insurance did) and guess what ... he bought a real kennel. Never saw the dogs loose again. Some people can be taught, but you'll have better luck with your dog [​IMG]

    That dog is absolutely gorgeous, btw! I have a malamute mix as well, but he doesn't look at all mal. He also thinks the chickens would make for a fun game, but we are working on that.
     
  9. jhm47

    jhm47 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 7, 2008
    I've had a variety of dogs in my 60+ years. My black lab was a wonderful hunter, and she killed a couple of chickens when she was a pup. In her later years, she never bothered them at all, although she was a wonderful pheasant hunter. I've also had an Airedale, a Walker coon hound, a pitbull, many Rat Terriers (have one now). Most of them killed a bird or two when pups, but quickly learned to leave the birds alone.

    We now live in a very small town. Our neighbor is a city policeman who has a yellow Lab. She barks incessantly, and is NEVER exercised or paid any attention to. Another neighbor has 3 mutts that bark even worse than the Lab. They live in a medium sized fenced yard, and never leave it. I have about 20 bantam chickens in my fenced yard. The roosters crow, and the hens cackle after they lay their eggs, but nobody complains, because the dogs' barking drowns out my chickens' sounds.

    But---back to the original question: Yes, dogs can definitely be taught not to kill birds. It takes time, and patience, but it can be done. And---puppies are the worst for "playing" with chickens, but when they mature, they get better quickly.

    The worst thing I've ever had that could not be trained not to kill was a runty kitten that my daughter rescued. It killed many of my rare peachicks. I now have bad feelings for all cats.
     
  10. rizq

    rizq Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 9, 2008
    Tennessee
    Quote:Those are usually the worst offenders if they ever do get out. Those that can be trained, but nobody bothered. Makes me feel very sad for the poor dogs.
     

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