Our hen attacked my two young kids

Wyorp Rock

nope
Premium Feather Member
Sep 20, 2015
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Southern N.C. Mountains
Update: Thanks again for all of the thoughtful replies. As of this weekend she has officially been rehomed two hours away with my uncle's flock. After spending a few hours in a crate where she and the flock could see each other, she integrated into a flock of Buff Orpingtons and Speckled Sussexes. I don't know if these breeds are particularly laid back or what, but the ruthless pecking pile-on I was worried about never came to pass. There was definitely pecking, but nothing too bad (it seemed to me that the rooster would step in and protect her if the pecking got to be too much, which surprised me a bit), and by the morning when we checked in on her she was roosting right in the middle of the flock. We're heartbroken, but glad she's somewhere where we can visit her often.

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Glad it went well.
Sounds like the rooster is doing his job - letting his gals battle it out, but keeping it under control (referee). Hens have their own pecking order, the rooster "revolves" around that and helps control drama.
 

BigBlueHen53

We will get through this... together!
Mar 5, 2019
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SE Missouri, USA
:old CULL HER! I have a friend who lost her eye as a child from a hen doing the same thing!!! Your kids are so much more important than that hen - you can get new chickens that will be docile and gentle.
Sorry, I agree. One strike, you're out. Your children are young enough to be seriously hurt PHYSICALLY (eyes cerainly, permanent facial scarring possibly, running, falling, broken bones possibly). I, an adult, was hurt by a rooster way beyond what I thought a 9-lb bird was capable of, and I was armed with a metal cane at the time. It was painful and TERRIFYING! Your children can also be severely and permanently traumatized by an encounter with an aggressive chicken, leaving them permanently scarred PSYCHOLOGICALLY for life. It just ain't worth it. Would you keep a vicious dog around in hopes it might get better before it harms your babies? Absolutely not. This is not good parenting. Get rid of the monster and protect your children - and yourself -ASAP. Opinion of one who has bwen there, done that, tore the T-shirt.
 

BigBlueHen53

We will get through this... together!
Mar 5, 2019
11,337
41,947
937
SE Missouri, USA
Update: Thanks again for all of the thoughtful replies. As of this weekend she has officially been rehomed two hours away with my uncle's flock. After spending a few hours in a crate where she and the flock could see each other, she integrated into a flock of Buff Orpingtons and Speckled Sussexes. I don't know if these breeds are particularly laid back or what, but the ruthless pecking pile-on I was worried about never came to pass. There was definitely pecking, but nothing too bad (it seemed to me that the rooster would step in and protect her if the pecking got to be too much, which surprised me a bit), and by the morning when we checked in on her she was roosting right in the middle of the flock. We're heartbroken, but glad she's somewhere where we can visit her often.

View attachment 2422463
Outstanding. So happy for her and proud of Big Bad Chicken Dad! ❤
 

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