Pair question!

Jun 29, 2018
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Today at this lake I been going to, when I first got there there was a small flock of Canada geese there and then a couple minutes later this pair and their 3 goslings came flying over from the parking lot next to the lake. They came out talking all loud to each other going crazy as if they were having a whole conversation back and forth to each other. Then they kept taking turns chasing each and every other goose acting like they own the lake. The gander would chase one then come back and honk like crazy to his mate,then the goose would chase another one and do the same thing. While their goslings were standing back eating. Not sure why they were doing this but it didn’t make sense and all the other geese were just minding their own business while this pair kept going back and forth chasing the other geese. They did this whole entire time I was there. What does this behavior mean?
 

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Miss Lydia

~Gift of God ~ Eternal Life ~John 3:16
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
Oct 3, 2009
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Mountains of Western N.C.
I see this behavior with mine although I only have two and it's usually more with my gander. They don't want any other birds near their mate and after they chase of the perceived threat then they have to go and brag about it. They probably do this to keep the bond strong too. Since it isn't mating season now. Head down walking towards the "perceived" threat [geese have a great imagination.] lol
 

townchicks

Free Ranging
Dec 1, 2016
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It may be about resources, that's what most territorial disputes are over. Is that bread you're feeding? Please choose a more appropriate treat. Better yet, just don't feed wild animals. It is not in their best interests.
 
Jun 29, 2018
169
83
86
I see this behavior with mine although I only have two and it's usually more with my gander. They don't want any other birds near their mate and after they chase of the perceived threat then they have to go and brag about it. They probably do this to keep the bond strong too. Since it isn't mating season now. Head down walking towards the "perceived" threat [geese have a great imagination.] lol

I was figuring that because it does always look like they’re bragging every time they chase another goose. Also there was only a flock there without goslings so they looked like they were the only family there those couple days, because I went there 3 days in a row and they still kept acting that same way.. going back and forth honking like crazy to each other and chasing each and every other goose away from their family. Why would they think of another goose as a threat though?
 

Miss Lydia

~Gift of God ~ Eternal Life ~John 3:16
Premium Feather Member
11 Years
Oct 3, 2009
115,571
135,548
1,962
Mountains of Western N.C.
I think everything is a perceived threat when they have a mate and babies whether it is or not. Having had my gander for 11 yrs ( he was hatched here) I think there isn’t anything that will change their minds they just have this ingrown belief that they have to protect and then when they do they have to brag about it. My gander is the secret service to his mate and any goslings just the way that stinker is.
 

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