Pekin duck eggs

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by hollys, Aug 30, 2014.

  1. hollys

    hollys New Egg

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    Aug 30, 2014
    I know this is for chickens but I have found some very useful information about pekin ducks on here as well. We have three ducks- one started laying eggs. My husband has been putting them in an incubator but I have no clue what to do with 9 ducklings in October. We won't eat the eggs ourselves but wouldn't mind giving them to someone instead of incubating them. Not sure what to do here and was hoping someone could help.
     
  2. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 18, 2014
    Livermore, CA
    Hollys, why won't you eat the eggs yourself?!?!?

    If possible, I would seriously reconsider your stance. They are nutritious and way more delicious than chicken eggs or anything store bought! And they are amazing for baking. Even if you just aren't a big egg eater, people have always needed eggs for cooking and baking in general. Loose the store-bought Mayonais, Dressings, Sauces and make them fresh yourself, that's a fantastic place to start (I grew up absolutely loathing Mayo, but when it's fresh and homemade, it's a totally different experience!).

    If for some reason you really can't eat the eggs yourself, then do you have any other animals? Dogs and Cats can and will likely eat all your eggs for you-- my mother started to keep chickens for this very reason (she has four dogs, all on a raw diet). I beleive other livestock can eat them as well, and so can your ducks, shells included! Though, if you're going to regularly feed the eggs back to your ducks, I'd maybe cut back a bit in the quantity and protein levels of they're regular feed.

    I'm curious, do you know for sure if you have a Drake or not? If not, your eggs won't ever fertilize and if you do, then 2 females to 1 Pekin Drake is not going to be a very healthy or comfortable relationship. Just a heads- up.

    Here's another easy/simple hidden egg recipe that we can't stop eating for breakfast:

    Take 1 banana and mash it up really good, add 1 egg and a good pinch of salt and mix to form a batter. Then pan fry in a little butter or oil, a minute or two per side. It's hella good! Basically gluten-free banana pancakes.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2014
  3. hollys

    hollys New Egg

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    Aug 30, 2014
    Some here can't eat the eggs because of allergies. I don't eat any eggs; only cook with them occasionally (breading cutlets). I don't like eating them. Not sure why- consistentcy? Taste? I just can't get them down.

    We have one drake and two females. He is mating with both females but we think only one is laying eggs. My husband brought the three ducklings home last spring. We read up on how to determine the sex and came up with one drake and two females as our best guess.

    I am going to try the banana pancake recipe with the eggs though, it sounds great (and healthy too!). Quick question though- do we just wash and refrigerate the eggs or is the refrigeration unnecessary?
     
  4. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The key is to keep the "bloom" in tact- with my Pekins, the bloom is the light brown coating on the shell-- when removed the shell color changes to white. In the wild, the bloom is an egg's only defense from contamination and it works pretty efficiently!

    If your duck's eggs are coming out clean, than you can lightly rub them down with a paper towel and wait to wash them until the eggs are about to be used. However if they are not being laid in a nest and/or you don't find them in time, they can get dirty. In that case, you can run them under tepid water, and/or use a soap-less scrub pad if they really need it. This will remove some to all of the bloom though, so these eggs should be prioritized and used sooner than others.

    *Never use cold water as that causes the inner contents to shrink and can actually pull contaminants inside.

    All Eggs keep best in a dry area with the temp. between 60-70 degrees. Refrigeration is the next best option.

    Hope that helps!
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2014
  5. KARy408

    KARy408 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 18, 2014
    Livermore, CA
    Oh also, forgot to mention, my mom is just like you! She doesn't like the taste of eggs but keeps chickens for the company and to feed the eggs to her dogs.

    However I will say if you've never tried one of your own ducks eggs, it's worth a shot! Personally, I think home grown eggs taste completely different from commercial eggs, duck eggs even more so! I've fried, scrambled, poached, boiled and baked my duck eggs-- overall I'd say they have a lushness to them that you just don't find in regular eggs. And the whites are a bit firmer than chicken eggs. Also, depending on how much exercise your ducks get and the qlty of feed you're giving them, they're eggs are probably lower in cholesterol and healthier for you than anything you've had before.

    Just my 2 cents! ;)
     

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