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Pheasant Breeders in Oregon?

Discussion in 'Pheasants and Partridge (Chukar)' started by Mary Coleman, Aug 16, 2015.

  1. BYC-user-174785

    BYC-user-174785 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes that is how ruffed pheasant males are!
     
  2. Mary Coleman

    Mary Coleman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 22, 2012
    North Eastern Oregon
    Wow wait! so, Lady Amhersts wont damage plants? so If i were to put them in an aviary with lots of nice grass then they wouldnt dig it all up and make the ground bare?
     
  3. BYC-user-174785

    BYC-user-174785 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They might nibble at the plants but they are not destructive. Eared Pheasants and Impeyans are notorious for their destructive nature. In the wild they dig for their food so they are the ones that destroy foliage. My pens are still grassy with impeyans so you can definitely have a nice planted pen with Lady Amherst pheasants. If the pen was too small for example then there might not be any grass in the pen, but given enough space and good conditions for growing plants there will be grass. They may create a dust bathing area but they will keep using this location and not be creating new holes all of the time.
     
  4. Mary Coleman

    Mary Coleman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    North Eastern Oregon
    Can you house two pairs together or is that a bad idea?
     
  5. BYC-user-174785

    BYC-user-174785 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The males will likely fight. It would be best to house the pairs separately or simply have a trio.
     
  6. Mary Coleman

    Mary Coleman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    North Eastern Oregon
    What does it mean to have a trio?
     
  7. BYC-user-174785

    BYC-user-174785 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A trio denotes one male and two hens.
     
  8. quackers57

    quackers57 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 13, 2015
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    I have only had a few pairs before but now 19 pheasants and all of them have been housed right next to chickens where they can touch through fence. Same with the turkeys we've had. Also our neighbours brought some peafowl and free ranged theme so of course they flew over to eat our chicken food and the male would even display to our chickens, neighbours allso have chickens. And none of those birds ever became Ill because of a diseases the chickens carry.
     
  9. BYC-user-174785

    BYC-user-174785 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just because a bird can survive in such a setting, it does not mean that is the most ideal setting. They definitely should not be housed together since the chances of them getting sick goes up since they have contact with chicken feces, which would be the case with what MedicalPrepper inquired about. I am not sure what pheasant species you have but when you start raising pheasants and have some expensive, rare ones that are hard enough to raise, you should not be taking the risk housing them next to chickens. That is how I am, so I no longer have any chickens since I did not want my ornamental birds getting sick from them.
     
  10. MedicalPrepper

    MedicalPrepper New Egg

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    Aug 17, 2015
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    Thank you, quackers57, for confirming what I already suspected to be the case.

    In my case, on my homestead way out in the boonies, I'm interested in raising birds primarily for the table... but it'd be fun and entertaining to have some ornamentals in the flock. If the experiment is ultimately unsuccessful, it will neither break my bank nor my heart... but now I'm encouraged to at least consider the possibility.
     

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