Please help me!! Chickens Dying

Lizzy733

Crowing
Nov 13, 2018
1,026
1,846
251
New Zealand
Raising their leg can also mean abdominal pain. With injury, you may see a bruise appear around 2-3 days after injury where their skill will turn green. Did you check the pads if her feet for scabs?

The above being said, leg injury wouldn't cause sudden death.

Let's look at your other ill hen. Blue in the comb would typically mean poor circulation or breathing issues.

Chickens can handle cold weather quite well, but do very poorly if they are overheated.

You should get your sick hen indoors in a cool quiet place - put some old towels down and paper towels over top so you can see what her poos are like. That can be a good indicator if what's going on.

Provide her food and water and monitor how well she's eating and drinking. Give her crop a check to see if it seems like she's eaten today.

This should get you started. If you have any rescue formulas, electrolytes or boosters, I'd give her a dose to hopefully help perk her up.

How is her breathing? Any fluid or gunk around the nostrils?
 

Eggcessive

Addict
Premium Feather Member
10 Years
Apr 3, 2011
63,071
56,473
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southern Ohio
If the leg just seemed injured, I would also worry about possible Mareks disease, but that is only a possibility. Usually, Mareks would not suddenly affect 2 birds at the same time.
 

LegbarMama

Songster
Mar 17, 2021
100
156
111
I will
Raising their leg can also mean abdominal pain. With injury, you may see a bruise appear around 2-3 days after injury where their skill will turn green. Did you check the pads if her feet for scabs?

The above being said, leg injury wouldn't cause sudden death.

Let's look at your other ill hen. Blue in the comb would typically mean poor circulation or breathing issues.

Chickens can handle cold weather quite well, but do very poorly if they are overheated.

You should get your sick hen indoors in a cool quiet place - put some old towels down and paper towels over top so you can see what her poos are like. That can be a good indicator if what's going on.

Provide her food and water and monitor how well she's eating and drinking. Give her crop a check to see if it seems like she's eaten today.

This should get you started. If you have any rescue formulas, electrolytes or boosters, I'd give her a dose to hopefully help perk her up.

How is her breathing? Any fluid or gunk around the nostrils?
I will do all of that but I did take this pic. Does this look normal?
 

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LegbarMama

Songster
Mar 17, 2021
100
156
111
If the leg just seemed injured, I would also worry about possible Mareks disease, but that is only a possibility. Usually, Mareks would not suddenly affect 2 birds at the same time.
I thought about that too. There was no sudden movements tho like I've read about with mareks disease. It was just a very slow and sad death.
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,908
11,588
611
North Florida
Do you have a vet that will run a fecal test for you? That will rule out internal parasites as a possible issue. Does her abdomen, below the vent, between the legs, feel bloated at all, either water balloon like or very firm? How is her weight/body condition, is her keel bone very prominent, or does it feel well muscled? Is she showing any signs of molt, any pin feathers coming in anywhere?
Many things that can happen will have very similar symptoms, so narrowing it down can take some time. In some cases a necropsy after they pass is the only way to know for sure.
 

Lizzy733

Crowing
Nov 13, 2018
1,026
1,846
251
New Zealand
I
I will

I will do all of that but I did take this pic. Does this look normal?
Is that green? Green can mean starvation, worms or coccidia - especially when paired with a pale comb.

The urates(whites) look good. If they are yellow, that can mean kidney/liver issues.

It doesn't look too watery either, which can indicate heat stress.

How is her appetite? Is she eating? Crop completely empty?

A fecal float test from the vet would be a good start. - this doesn't need to be done by a specialist. Any vet can do these and they're generally pretty cheap.

This can confirm worms or coccidia and what type, as some worms aren't killed by the OTC stuff (looking at you tapeworm).
 

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