pop door winter question????

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by andrea98, Nov 12, 2010.

  1. andrea98

    andrea98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ok so what i would like to know is:
    1. should i find a way to some how slow down the wind that comes in to my coop thru the pop door , the pop door is facing the south & we usuall have a west wind
    2.what should i use to slow the wind down? plastic strips like you see on cooler doors , burlap.. ect..will they use it i guess is my biggest question [​IMG]
    (a small amount of snow does blow in depending on what way the wind is blowing of course & if it rains with wind it comes in also)
     
  2. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    I have a west facing pop door and the winter winds/storms come from the north west. I leaned a piece of wood up against it (it's actually the bottom half of a solid door so it's heavy). The birds still can go in and out but the door cuts the wind down. When we really get into winter where it's snowing I'll put a tarp over the west end, but for now this helps.
     
  3. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:That sounds good, I think I'll steal it [​IMG] I was going to build a covered tunnel with a 90 degree turn to solve that problem, but I never got around to it and I'm not sure how long it would take the crazy birds to get used to it--it's getting too cold and wet around here to let them sleep in the run because they're all freaked out that I changed something.

    I got the wrong shavings for the coop once--fine grind (almost sawdust) instead of the large chips that they are used to. They're made out of the same stuff but the goofy birds took forever to go to bed. They'd stick their heads thru the pop door and then freak out and huddle up in the run--probably would spend all winter out there in the rain and snow if I tried to do the tunnel now...
     
  4. andrea98

    andrea98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    in my barnyard....ohio
    I was going to build a covered tunnel with a 90 degree turn to solve that problem... <<<<i thought about that also..& the fact it will take em 4 ever to get use to it as they stay outside. when i cleaned the coop this time i put hay in the nest boxes & they stopped laying for a few days & now the weather is starting to change i only have one that lays every day & a random other out of 6 girls (5 bantam cochins and one american game<she is my white eggs layer). i have also noticed alot of feathers in the coop , could this be a molt??? they still have very soft fluff on their rumps just not the hard "outter" feathers
     
  5. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It's the right time of year for a molt--goofy chooks getting naked for the winter [​IMG] Sometimes pullets will have a mini molt their first year, but if your girls are going into their second winter and around 18-months old, be prepared for chickens that looke pre-plucked (they don't all get that bad) and a coop that looks like a pillow fight gone horribly wrong.
     
  6. andrea98

    andrea98 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    in my barnyard....ohio
    yes this is their second winter & just around 19 mths... yes yes yes on the bad pillow fight lol [​IMG] dang nuts!! they have bald necks & fluffy butts lol i might have to take up knitting so they dont freeze to death [​IMG]
     
  7. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Yes it is worth making arrangements to limit how much wind whooshes directly into the popdoor. Be aware there will always be some breeze thru there though -- and that is perfectly ok (during daytime anyhow).

    There are a lot of ways that you can do it, many of them mentioned in earlier posts.

    IMHO the best approach is twofold: 1) construct a windbreak outside of the coop, preferably of ample dimension (and definitely sturdy enough it won't blow/fall over!), and then also 2) use a curtain or plastic strips in the doorway.

    A common windbreak is a couple bales of straw or mulch hay, spiked into the ground with rebar or some similar arrangement so they don't fall over; or some plywood or plastic or burlap applied to the upwind run fencing if it is not too far from the popdoor. (If you go attaching things to run fencing, make real sure your run fencing is sturdy enough not to get blown askew/over by the increased wind load!! And you might make it only half the height of the run fence). You will want to think carefully about exactly how you arrange it, because you don't want to find your setup channelling wind INTO the popdoor when you get a storm from the East! Two useful possibilities are to have the windbreak be set back some reasonable distance from the popdoor (tho then of course it needs to be correspondingly larger), and/or to have it be in L or T fashion, with or without gaps.

    To use a curtain (e.g. canvas or burlap) or plastic strips (I use strips maybe 8" wide cut from very heavy translucent plastic shelf liner from Walmart, overlapped for almost half their width) you are likely to have to start with it only half-installed or half-pinned-up (or maybe even less than "half" if your chickens are very timid or conspiracy-theory-minded) and let them get used to the idea before fully commissioning the device. With gradual training, though, pretty much all chickens do learn to use these things.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  8. VioletBlueIvy

    VioletBlueIvy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I have just the opposite fluffy necks and bald butts!

    I did the lean something over the opening thing too. It cuts the wind, keeps the stoop free of snow, and keeps snow/ice from building up around the door so I cant close it properly at night. I do this when we get a lot of rain too. I was actually thinking of attaching it to hinges so I can fold it up against the barn when it's not in use so it stays put of the way without getting misplaced, or accidentally appropriated.
     
  9. Knock Kneed Hen

    Knock Kneed Hen California Dream'in Chickens

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    So. Cal.
    Quote:I have just the opposite fluffy necks and bald butts!

    I did the lean something over the opening thing too. It cuts the wind, keeps the stoop free of snow, and keeps snow/ice from building up around the door so I cant close it properly at night. I do this when we get a lot of rain too. I was actually thinking of attaching it to hinges so I can fold it up against the barn when it's not in use so it stays put of the way without getting misplaced, or accidentally appropriated.

    That's a good idea for storing it. So far I've just been leaning mine against the back wall. It gives a hen a place to run and hide if scared or getting picked on. Of course, I'll have to put a sign on it now that I realize it could be "accidentally appropriated"--mostly by me...I tend to forget what I'm doing and why sometimes [​IMG]
     

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