Preparing Your Flock & Coop for WINTER

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by iwiw60, Aug 26, 2014.

  1. jtn42248

    jtn42248 Overrun With Chickens

    It is important that they have adequate ventilation without having drafts (wind blowing on them). You might try to fill in some of the cracks in the lower part of the coop and make sure there are not that blow directly on the when they are roosting. I am thinking they will be fine so long as they have each other to cuddle against if it gets too cold.
     
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  2. Welcome back!I wondered where you was hiding.

    Too bad about the files. You might be able to use your Pinterest page to recover some...maybe?
     
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  3. JackE

    JackE Overrun With Chickens

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  4. khawks

    khawks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow! thanks for the info. Do you remember round abouts what it cost you to build it?
     
  5. iwiw60

    iwiw60 Overrun With Chickens

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    Bungee cords are one of my three "must-haves" ... bungees, duct tape, and baling wire. You can build just about anything with 'em!! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2014
  6. iwiw60

    iwiw60 Overrun With Chickens

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    About a week ago we here in Central Oregon had what we refer to as "a big wind" along with downpours of rain. As a result my coop floor got wet all along the west wall which is where the double doors are located....
    [​IMG]
    That strong wind blew the rain right at the coop and as you can see my "brilliant plan" fell apart right before my eyes. My coop roof (it's a LifeTime Shed) only overhangs about 2" and it just wasn't enough to keep the driving rain out of the door opening cracks.

    SO! I'll have to make-do for this winter but come spring I'm adding an overhang 'roof' to that wall which will come out about 6 feet...that'll do it! Gosh, it never seems to end, does it? [​IMG]
     
  7. live and learn is my new motto with chickens [​IMG]
     
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  8. JackE

    JackE Overrun With Chickens

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    Right around $1000. But that was 5yrs ago. For example, the siding I used (Smartside) was $18, for a 4X8' sheet. Now it goes for something like $28 a sheet. Everything costs more. But you could still build it for less, than if you went out and bought a new, comparable sized shed, and converted it to a coop.
     
  9. khawks

    khawks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yes, thats the problem i'm having. Is that every shed seems to cost at least $1000 and that is way out of my budget. So far i'm just doing with what i have. i also have all of my chickens separated for breeding purposes and i'm thinking that a few smaller coops would be better than one large one.
     
  10. jtn42248

    jtn42248 Overrun With Chickens

    If you are focusing on the breeding of your chickens then smaller coops is absolutely the way to go. I don't breed my chickens but I do my ducks and while they free range at will I have breeding/hatching pens that I use when a female goes broody. It is like a small dog house sized coop on a raised platform with wire bottom and a water container sunk to floor level. Works great. Something similar should work for chickens as well. Keep your breeds apart or at least in the combinations that you want to cross and have a seperate area for the broody hen to sit.
     

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