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Prolapsed Oviduct Help plz

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Shrea18, Jan 1, 2016.

  1. Shrea18

    Shrea18 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 27, 2015
    Dade city
    ok so I got home and found some blood around my quail coop. after inspecting my quails I found one had a Prolapsed Oviduct and had laid an egg. I know it's her egg bc of the blood on the egg. after bringing her inside and doing some research I went to push it back in but it was already back in and secreting whitish foam. she is young and new to laying her first egg was on Christmas day. is it normal for a Prolapsed Oviduct t go back fairly quickly. is it bc of her egg? can I prevent this. is she ok? now she is inside in a smaller cage alone and on fresh hay with food and water and crushed eggshells in her food. please advise what else I should do. thank you!!!
     
  2. DK newbie

    DK newbie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2015
    Perhaps make sure she gets less than ~8 hours of light a day, to put her off laying for a while so she can heal properly? I've never had a quail prolapse, but it seems like the logical way to go. I think I've heard something about oil in the feed, along with making sure they get plenty of calcium in their diets, to prevent problems with egg laying. If she didn't get additional calcium before, I think making sure they all have it from now on will be enough to prevent most egg laying problems, but if they did have calcium before, it might take more than that.
    Quail are apparently surprisingly hardy, she might be just fine in a few days. But if you have any antibiotics, I'd give some to her to prevent an infection. And if she seems stressed by being alone, perhaps bring a friend in for her - or place her cage outside by the others so she can see them. Or even put her back with them, if she behaves normally.
     

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