Puncture wound to crop?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mychickenbrood, Mar 13, 2013.

  1. mychickenbrood

    mychickenbrood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2012
    Central Valley CA.
    I have a hen who has three puncture wounds, apparently from a dog. One is near or in her crop and there is drainage from it. One is behind her neck and one is on her back. But the skin over the crop is greenish colored. Her food is green. What is the best treatment? I put her in a pen by herself and started antibiotics. I put antibiotic creme into the wounds. Also, I gave her a bath, as she was such a mess and let her dry. Then I fed her some poached egg.

    Any ideas? Do you think she'll survive? The wounds are very deep.
     
  2. TOP KNOT

    TOP KNOT Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 10, 2013
    SHERIDAN IL
    If the wounds are that severe it probably would not hurt to call your vet for advice. I am sure they would gladly give you some phone instructions. I hope she gets well
     
  3. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    Jan 17, 2013
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    keep her on the antibotic ive seen some amazing healing in hurt chickens. on this forum! vet advice wouldn't hurt either . keep it clean id also put antibotic on the sore, only YOU know how bad it is and if its that deep get her stiches to help healing! keep her warm and out of shock if you can.please consider the stiches for the deep wounds.
     
  4. mychickenbrood

    mychickenbrood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 12, 2012
    Central Valley CA.
    Thanks for the responses. I really do appreciate any feedback. Although I've had a lot of luck healing chickens, I determined that this poor girl was beyond help, at least without a prohibitive vet bill and even then, who knows? So I took her to the animal shelter yesterday and they euthanized her for $20.00. Well worth it. She didn't have to suffer and I didn't have to do the deed. There was a puncture wound right through her crop and it was obviously infected. She was bright eyed, but not eating and her crop was extended and hard. Given that and her other injuries, I felt that eventually she would die, so made the decision to relieve her of her suffering.

    One thing I learned from this is to examine a chicken thoroughly, as soon as one notices any problem. I thought her comb was the only thing bleeding and that the rooster was pecking her. Treated it with no peck and Vetricyn, but she continued to hide in the corner of the coop. On closer inspection, I discovered she had been attacked by a dog.

    Thanks again.
     

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