Putting some eggs back for the winter.

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by BettyR, Jun 27, 2008.

  1. BettyR

    BettyR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 1, 2008
    Texas Gulf Coast
    I have been reading this book named A Guide to Raising Chickens. I couldn’t help myself I was really curious to see if I was doing it right according to the book.

    I did find one part very interesting; it’s called Thermostabilization.

    They say housewives regularly practiced it during the late 19th century. Heating destroys most spoilage-causing bacteria on the shell and seals the shell by coagulating a thin layer of albumen just beneath it. When the egg cools the coagulated albumen sticks to the egg membrane and cannot be seen in the opened egg.

    Process the eggs the day they are laid by heating tap water to exactly 130°, use a thermometer since temperature is critical. The water must be just warm enough to destroy spoilage germs but not hot enough to cook the eggs.

    Place the eggs in a wire basket such as a vegetable steamer, deep fryer basket, or pasta cooker. Submerge the eggs in the water for 15 minutes if they are at room temperature, or 18 minutes if they have been in the frig. Lift eggs out drain and dry. Thermostabilized eggs will stay fresh for two weeks at room temperature or eight months stored in the coldest part of the frig.

    Of course you will need to mark the eggs with an expiration date.

    We keep an extra frig in the garage for food storage because the closest grocery store is a 30 minute drive. We never put anything in the vegetable crisper part of the frig so I think I’ll turn that part of the frig into the egg storage compartment and put some of my summer glut of eggs back for the winter when the laying slows way down or comes to a halt during molting.
     
  2. amyquilt

    amyquilt Serama Mama

    May 17, 2008
    Amarillo, TX
    Very interesting!
     
  3. kellim

    kellim Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 19, 2008
    SC, GA Border
    hmmm, I have never heard of that but it sounds neat! I think I might as my great aunt about if they used to do that. What a fabulous way to get her to tell me some of her stories!!!
     
  4. miss_jayne

    miss_jayne Lady_Jayne

    Jun 26, 2008
    Columbiaville, MI
    the only way i have utilized to save an egg for later use was to scramble the egg and put it into an ice cube tray. (one egg per cube area) you can use them later to cook with and bake with. maybe that will help a little?
     

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