Question about cedar coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by sheila3935, Feb 10, 2011.

  1. sheila3935

    sheila3935 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a cedar playhouse that I plan on using this spring for a bantam coop. It is new and has a strong cedar smell. I am going to put it up in a few week when it gets a little warmer. My question is can I paint it or seal it to make it safe for my chickens. Which is better painting or sealing? I was thinking a semi gloss for at least the inside will that work?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2011
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    People do use well aged cedar around chickens without a problem, but the "strong cedar smell" would stop me from putting chickens in it. I don't know that you can stop the fumes with paint. Maybe talk to someone at a good paint store like Porter.
     
  3. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree; you don't really want to put your chickens inside a coop that has a noticeable cedar odor.
     
  4. aubreynoramarie

    aubreynoramarie designated lawn flamingo

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    Can anyone actually point me to a study that proves that the SMELL of cedar is bad for chickens? First it's the dust in the shavings getting in their lungs, now were saying that cedar FUMES (? Wood emits FUMES?) can't be covered up by paint and it can kill your chickens?

    I've always used a light dusting of cedar mixed with pine and hay in my coop and have never ever seen a much as a sneeze.
    I'd say you're fine painting it. I'm still trying to wrap my head around cedar fumes being stronger than paint.
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    A proper paintjob will seal the wood and prevent fumes (from the oils in the cedar wood, that is).

    As long as you paint it and let it dry/cure til it no longer smells like a) a paint can or b) a cedar closet, I would not worry, especially as long as you have sufficient ventilation which of course you should for other reasons anyhow [​IMG]

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  6. Dogfish

    Dogfish Rube Goldberg incarnate

    Mar 17, 2010
    Western Washington
    No issues with my Cedar coop. Just don't use cedar shavings.
     
  7. sheila3935

    sheila3935 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I intend to put it up before winter is over and not put the chickens in it til warm weather. They are fine where they are right now til spring. So you think if I paint it and let it cure or even put it up and let it sit in the weather it will be ok? so long as I dont smell the cedar smell? Which is better paint or not. I dont want to hurt my little ones but want to use this for the bantam coop. This is what it look like
    http://www.ruralking.com/playhouse-winchester.html
     
  8. crj

    crj Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think if you put the house outside and let it air out till spring you might be ok. You may not have to paint it. I wouldn't want to paint cedar. It's to nice of a wood and keeps bugs away. The smell may go away enough to put chicks in it when spring comes around.
     
  9. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Oh, if you are not going to use it til spring I would not bother painting it. The fresh-cut smell will dissipate pretty well by then.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  10. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This article references human studies about cedar fumes as a respiratory irritant.

    http://www.trifl.org/cedar.shtml

    Chickens like all birds have much more efficient respiratory systems than we do, so they are more vulnerable to airborne toxins. Remember the canary in the coal mine?

    I don't think anyone here is saying cedar fumes are worse than paint fumes. Of course you should never put your chickens back inside a freshly painted coop if it still smells of paint. That's risky, too.

    An experienced poultry keeping friend of mine also uses a small bit of cedar shavings under pine shavings in his nest boxes in the summer to deter mites. A little bit won't hurt, but a lot (a whole coop full) is quite a different matter. But think about it: why do the cedar shavings deter insects in the first place? It's because the oils are irritants and toxic.
     

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