Question about to dig post hole or not....

TammyTX

Crowing
10 Years
Feb 16, 2009
2,064
146
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Texas
We have a "floating" chicken coop...currently just the shed...that we will attach a roosting compartment onto.

The shed is 8x10 and sits on concrete blocks to make it level. It's one of those Sturdi-bilt sheds. The attached roosting area will be 8x10, too, only not all of the way to the ground.

My question is, when building the frame for the roosting area, do we let the addition "float" like the rest of the building or do we support it with post holes, therefore attaching it to the ground?

I probably am not explaining it clearly, so here is a rendition of what the finished product will look like...we only have the actual shed up at the moment:

Any help would be great!
 
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MoonShadows

The Jam Man
7 Years
6 Years
Jan 23, 2013
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Pocono Mtns
My Coop
My Coop
If I am understanding you correctly, you can let it float and can still have stability and strength. We built our coop (8 x 10) and our run (10 x 16) without digging one hole. The coop rests on concrete blocks and gravel, and the run rests on 4" x 6" beams that just sit on the ground. To add stability to the run, we just put in strategic braces at 45 degree angles. We are planning on building a second run of about 150 sq ft coming off the back of the coop this spring since we are expanding our flock, and that will float too.

 
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TammyTX

Crowing
10 Years
Feb 16, 2009
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Texas
if Moonshadow's response did not answer it, explain a little more, I was not clear either.
I am terrible explaining about things. :(

My question is, since the shed is not attached to the ground, should the roost portion sit on posts that are concreted into the ground? I should have mentioned that our ground is Texas Blackland Prairie...black dirt with a high clay content that gets sizeable cracks in the summer.

The blue arrows indicate the support posts that I'm questioning whether they should be sunk into the ground or not. The shed sits on blocks. (We will use as many of those posts as needed, it just made for a clearer picture to have only three.) What I'm afraid of are the two portions shifting independently of each other to the point of creating structural problems.


The lattice work in the top picture will only serve to keep the chickens out of the droppings under the roost, it provides no support which is why I took it off of this picture.
 
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yogifink

Songster
6 Years
May 16, 2013
464
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Pinebluff, nc
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You would not want to have to different types of foundations for the same building. The earth naturally heaves throughout the year; meaning, during periods of frost, freeze, lots of rain, drought, etc, the ground moves and shifts. If you have two different types of foundations for the same building, this natural shifting will cause failures in the building.

So, you would want to, as you say 'float', your posts.


Concerning your foundation in general, permanent, frequently used sheds, barns or in this case a chicken coop should have a more permeant foundation and should not be left just 'floating' on a few blocks.This will cause unequal weight distribution over time and the blocks will shift and sink, again, causing the building to fail. As an inexpensive quick fix, consider moving the whole unit to a slab foundation, or at the very least, a crushed stone pad. - or if you want to get crafty, considering you have a high clay soil, make yourself an adobe slab foundation for the cost of a few straw bales :)
 
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tacky

Hatching
5 Years
Apr 15, 2014
2
0
6
Briar ,Tx
Your idea is fine to set posts.ive built lots of decks onto big triple wide mobile homes with never any problem.the roof is connected to house and posts are concreted in.a whole lot bigger scale than your chicken coop would ever be.
 

TammyTX

Crowing
10 Years
Feb 16, 2009
2,064
146
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Texas
Your idea is fine to set posts.ive built lots of decks onto big triple wide mobile homes with never any problem.the roof is connected to house and posts are concreted in.a whole lot bigger scale than your chicken coop would ever be.
Mobile homes are usually anchored to the ground, though, aren't they?
 

tacky

Hatching
5 Years
Apr 15, 2014
2
0
6
Briar ,Tx
Yes.the concern with a "floating" building using a block foundation is usually related to sinking not floating up,except in extremely high winds.my experience says your idea is ok.what part of tx are you in?im in Briar,northwest of ft.worth.
 

TammyTX

Crowing
10 Years
Feb 16, 2009
2,064
146
258
Texas
Yes.the concern with a "floating" building using a block foundation is usually related to sinking not floating up,except in extremely high winds.my experience says your idea is ok.what part of tx are you in?im in Briar,northwest of ft.worth.
I'm about 25 miles east and slightly south of downtown Austin (not Elgin proper).


If we get enough rain then the ground gets soft and all of the cracks fill in. We are on blackland prairie but also have a gravely clay about two foot down. Actually, we have a weird piece of land with good dirt over here and bad dirt over there..our home sits on the dirt that doesn't crack, thank goodness.
 
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