Question about using concrete blocks under coop and run base/frame.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by valleychicks, Jan 29, 2014.

  1. valleychicks

    valleychicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    We are getting ready to start on our coop and run. Should we use concrete blocks under our coop and run base/frame? And why or why not? I'm sorry if this question has already been asked. I look through the forums and didn't see anything about using the concrete blocks. If it has been posted please direct me to the thread. I have noticed on some of the coop pictures that people dig an area out and put the concrete blocks in then put the base/frame on the blocks. Is it for predators or more for better construction? Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2014
  2. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    New Brunswick,Canada
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    My coop is only 4x8 and concrete block are what I used inexpensive and serve the purpose no complaints from me (17 chickens in my coop). I laid my block like this to keep the birds from escaping when they go under the coop. It has it advantages and disadvantages.

    Yes a Golden Comet chicken can fit through that opening in a cinder block.

    If you give my coop a second look you will notice a trailer hitch on the east end (my coop faces north; east will be better I learned this year). I move my coop and run every year so the advantage out way the disadvantages in my case.
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    If your coop is to remain stationary mabe roll the block 90ยบ so the holes are facing out your coop is lest likely to settle and move once you strike a level. (I am more concerned with good enough rather than level).

    You can tell where my coop was the previous year by the location of this garden spot and young buck. Makes gardening Easy Peasy less weeds. My gardens grow like wild fire.
    Works for me in my small set up.

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    " I have close to 64 trips now around the sun; My coop was salvaged; Blew away from a relative. Hundreds of Coops can put mine to shame but it "MAKES ME HAPPY!""
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
  3. valleychicks

    valleychicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Cute Coop!
     
    1 person likes this.
  4. Ernie G

    Ernie G Out Of The Brooder

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    Set them s you would lay them for more strength. Do not stand them.
     
  5. valleychicks

    valleychicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oh, ok. I figured it was something about being more stable but wasn't sure. Thank you!
     
  6. Alex41

    Alex41 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 21, 2013
    Eastern PA

    I have skids under my coop, but will also set it on blocks half buried in the ground. Main reason is to keep the wood from rotting with constant contact on the ground
     
    3 people like this.
  7. valleychicks

    valleychicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    We plan to paint all the wood to hopefully help reduce rot. We will definitely consider using blocks under the base/frame after what you've said. Want the coop and run to last for as many years as possible. Thank you!
     
  8. Alex41

    Alex41 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 21, 2013
    Eastern PA
    Painting will definitely make the wood last longer, but won't help much with the wood in contact with the ground. The bottom of my coop is 12" above the ground for two reasons. (1) is to give the birds some shade and (2), is to allow air to flow under the coop to keep the wood underneath dry. Use pressure treated for any ground contact.

    Alex
     
    2 people like this.

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